Recent Posts

Ep. 43 – The Untold Story of a Midcentury Modern Architect

An interview with Dale Gyure about architect Minoru Yamasaki, whose projects include the original World Trade Center. http://traffic.libsyn.com/yaleuniversitypresspodcast/2018-1-18-Minoru_Yamasaki.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS

Cold War Maps to “Wake Up” Southeast Asian Buddhists

Eugene Ford— It took me a year to sort through volumes of Thai religious journals in the sometimes sweltering halls of Bangkok’s monastic libraries, where the few Western researchers sat elbow-to-elbow with saffron-clad monks. That research laid the groundwork for what I had begun to envision as an international history

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The Dangers of Controlling Wolf Populations

Brandy R. Fogg— Current wolf population management strategies in the U.S are not supported by scientific research and are doing more harm than good. Gordon Haber and Marybeth Holleman’s Among Wolves: Gordon Haber’s Insights into Alaska’s Most Misunderstood Animals brings several issues with current predator management strategies to the light.

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Ep. 42 – Cybersecurity in an Insecure Age

Cybersecurity expert and former Google privacy analyst Susan Landau on the increasing risks of not securing our data and devices and the threat from outside entities such as Russia and North Korea. http://traffic.libsyn.com/yaleuniversitypresspodcast/2017-12-15-Cybersecurity.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS

The First Discovery of Feathered Dinosaurs

Alan Feduccia— Before the astounding recent discoveries of avian and dinosaurian fossils from the Mesozoic of China, the only substantial evidence for the earliest evolution of birds from their reptilian beginnings came from fossil specimens from the approximately 150-million-year-old deposits from the Late Jurassic of Bavaria, specimens known to the

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Cyber Diasporas and New Radical Citizenries

Philippe-Joseph Salazar— Globalism was premised on the idea that borders ought to be fluid to allow for free movements of ideas, goods, and individuals. However in the wake of sudden and massive migrations of dispersed populations into Europe, the time-honored relationship between space and people–autochthony—is regaining currency. To frame it,

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Brazil’s First Art Cannibal: Tarsila do Amaral

Interview with curators Stephanie D’Alessandro and Luis Pérez-Oramas by David Ebony The paintings of Brazilian artist Tarsila do Amaral (1886-1973)—simply known as Tarsila—and the theory of Anthropophagy, or the philosophy of “cultural cannibalism,” introduced in 1928 by Tarsila’s first husband, Brazilian poet Oswald de Andrade (1890-1954), were for me a

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Why the Nazis won’t come back

Daniel Siemens— Germany, like many other European countries, has recently seen a remarkable success of a newly formed right-wing nationalist party. At the last national elections in September 2017, the so-called Alternative for Germany (AfD) finished third with 12.6% of the votes. It even became the strongest party in the

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How Do We Know What’s True?

Janna R. White & Wendy Hasenkamp— In May 2016 the Wall Street Journal published an interactive online tool called “Blue Feed, Red Feed” that allowed one to see the dueling social media feeds of liberal and conservative users during the run-up to the 2016 presidential election. This side-by-side comparison revealed

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