Recent Posts

The Original Constitution of the United States: Religion, Race, and Gender

Many who declare that Americans in 2018 should stick to the original words of the United States Constitution, ratified in 1788, fail to acknowledge that in reality the nation has been ruled by a substantially different Constitution for the past 150 years.  The Union victory in 1865, and the amendments

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Art Deco Chicago

Robert Bruegmann– If I had to pick a single object to suggest what we tried to do in Art Deco Chicago, I would probably choose this Craftsman brand portable air compressor sold by Sears starting in 1939. During the meetings we held with authors, editors, and advisors to settle on

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Embracing Neurodiversity

Jason Tougaw— The concept of neurodiversity—the idea that every brain is a little different, some more than others—could transform neuroscience education and public perceptions about the brain. The concept is socially and politically valuable. And it’s intellectually honest. In his book Neuro-Tribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of

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Harvey Milk’s Jewish Identity

Lillian Faderman— The Jewish identity of Harvey Milk—arguably the most famous gay man in modern history—was as important to who he was and what he did as his gay identity. In San Francisco where he became a prominent gay leader and politician in the 1970s, he often introduced himself as

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Closet Skeletoneers

Simon Lailvaux— According to the World Bank, with a population of 25 million people Australia is the fifty-third most populous country in the world, ranking below North Korea and above Côte d’Ivoire. But despite this sparse population, Australia is a sporting giant – at least in the summer. The land

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We Are Not Our Parents’ Parent

Jody Gastfriend— I often refer to my 89-year-old mother as the Energizer Bunny.  She’s always on the go and is good at recharging her reservoir of energy. While her walking is limited, my mom still drives and enjoys running errands. On a recent trip to the supermarket, my mother encountered

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The Hero and the Madman: Two American Myths

Mary Stockwell— Even the most hidebound analytical historian can’t resist the archetype of the hero. The hero comes forward  at the beginning of great events, sets out on a quest, often against a terrifying foe, and in the process wins glory for himself. At the founding of the United States, one

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Free Speech on Campus

Erwin Chemerinsky and Howard Gillman— We find much of what is said about free speech on college campuses unsatisfying. We are deeply troubled by the efforts to suppress and punish the expression of unpopular ideas. Those who call for punishment of speech that makes students feel uncomfortable fail to recognize

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Winslow Homer and the Camera

Dana E. Byrd and Frank H. Goodyear — Research projects can begin in many different ways. Winslow Homer and the Camera began with a phone call from a man named Neal Paulson who lives in Scarborough, Maine, and who claimed to own Winslow Homer’s camera. The call was a surprise

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