Recent Posts

“What Wine Goes with Cap’n Crunch?”

Ian Tattersall and Rob DeSalle— Asking, with the comedian George Carlin, “What wine goes with Cap’n Crunch?” might not actually be as trivial as it sounds. In fact, many people spend a lot of time worrying about which foods go best with which wines. This concern is not frivolous: the

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Why Are We Still Reading Jane Austen (But Not Mary Brunton)?

H. J. Jackson— Up to 1860, the career paths of Jane Austen and Mary Brunton were strikingly similar. If Brunton had an advantage in the reviews and reference books, Austen—who after all produced more novels—gradually took the lead in numbers of editions and reprints. Almost exact contemporaries, they both started

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Ep. 32 – The Nazi Obsession with the Occult

The Nazi obsession with the occult and supernatural is well-known in pop culture. Eric Kurlander gives us the real story beyond what we’ve seen in Hollywood and comics. http://traffic.libsyn.com/yaleuniversitypresspodcast/2017-7-13-Nazi-Occult.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS

Net Neutrality and The Internet of Things

Philip N. Howard— The internet of things will help bring structure to global politics, but we must work for a structure we want. This is a challenging project, but if we don’t take it on our political lives will become fully structured by algorithms we don’t understand, data flows we

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Jupiter, Ho!

Jon Willis— Galileo entered Jupiter orbit on December 8, 1989, just one day after the drama and revelations of the descent probe. Although Galileo was a Jupiter orbiter, the proximity of Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto offered the opportunity for multiple flybys of the Galilean satellites. During its eight-year mission to Jupiter, Galileo completed thirty-five

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Ep. 3 – Understanding Russia

Russia expert David Satter talks about the fall of Yeltsin, the rise of Putin, and what lies ahead for Russia and the United States. (This episode originally aired 5/26/2016) http://traffic.libsyn.com/yaleuniversitypresspodcast/2016-5-26-Understanding-Russia.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS

Disraeli, de Rothschild, and the Struggle to Admit Jews to Parliament

Rosemary Ashton— What was it like to live in London through one of the hottest summers on record, with the River Thames emitting a sickening smell as a result of the sewage of over two million inhabitants being discharged into the river and floating up and down with the tide, never

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Ep. 6 – The Founders’ Case for an Activist Government

The long-held belief that the Declaration of Independence calls for a small government may not be an accurate assessment. Historian Steve Pincus discusses the meaning of this seminal document as well as its continuing influence in modern politics and American life. (This episode originally ran 10/20/2016) http://traffic.libsyn.com/yaleuniversitypresspodcast/2016-10-20-Founders-Case-Activist-Government.mp3Podcast: Play in new

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Pride Month Bookshelf: LGBTQIA+ History, Cultural Studies, and Literature Beyond June

Presenting our Yale University Press Pride Month reading list—because celebrating #Pride2017, learning from the history of the movement, championing stories and contributions of LGBTQIA+ individuals, and working each day to insist on equal and fair treatment of queer communities should extend far beyond June. Homintern: How Gay Culture Liberated the Modern World by Gregory

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