Recent Posts

African Americans and Africa

Nemata Amelia Ibitayo Blyden— My father, born in Sierra Leone, used to tell us stories about being a student at Lincoln University in the 1940s. A historically black college, Lincoln was founded in 1854 to provide an education in arts and sciences for young men of African descent. Accomplished African

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Ep. 76 – The complex relationship between Frank Lloyd Wright and New York City

Architectural historian Anthony Alofsin offers us an entirely new way of looking at role New York City played in the life and career of Frank Lloyd Wright — and a new way of looking at the city, as well. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | Soundcloud

A Time to Write and a Time to Resist

David G. Roskies— Writing, we are told, is a form of resistance. The act of writing is an assertion of one’s selfhood, one’s right to live, think and feel in the face of all that negates it. But writing can just as easily be an escape from reality, an exercise

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Israel and the Conundrums of the Left

Susie Linfield— Both the Democratic Party in the U.S. and the Labour Party in Britain are in a tizzy over issues relating to Israel and anti-Semitism. Stateside, Rep. Ilhan Omar’s various statements about Israel, AIPAC, hypnosis, dual loyalties, and “Benjamins” sent the Democratic-controlled House of Representatives into months of tormented

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New Perspectives on N. C. Wyeth

Well known during the twentieth century for his bold, imaginative illustrations that brought new characterizations to classic stories such as Treasure Island and The Boy’s King Arthur, N. C. Wyeth (1882–1945) vigorously pursued parallel interests in painting landscapes, seascapes, portraits, still lifes, murals and advertising images throughout his career. N.

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The Artist at Home with Her Art: Ruth Asawa

Interview with Tamara H. Schenkenberg by David Ebony   Japanese-American artist Ruth Asawa (1926-2013) is a unique figure in contemporary art. Her abstract sculptures, created with a novel, looped wire technique that resembles basket-weaving, are often misunderstood. For some, they embody the clash between craft and “fine art,” remaining uncertain as

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Reflecting on Our History at Yale University Press

From time to time it is important to step back and look at where you’ve come from and how that shapes where you’re going. That goes for life and it goes for business. For a university press like ours, with the rapid pace of publishing so many great books every

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The Bold Colors of Paul Gauguin

Marcia B. Hall — Paul Gauguin sought to express his sense of spirituality in his paintings. Weary with the materialism of sophisticated European society, he escaped to the South Seas in his search. As a very young child he had spent five years in Peru, then as a teenager traveled

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Espionage and the I Ching

Michael Harrington— The study of espionage has a long history in China. The classic known as The Art of War, dating from a period of strife between the states of pre-imperial China, contains an entire chapter devoted to the use of spies. One of the overall themes of this short

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