Posts by artbooks

Destabilizing the Image: An Andy Warhol Retrospective

Interview with Donna De Salvo by David Ebony New art’s never new when it’s done. . . It’s not new art. You don’t know it’s new. You don’t know what it is. It doesn’t become new until about ten years later, because then it looks new. — Andy Warhol, The

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Marcel Duchamp and the Museum    

Matthew Affron–                       Marcel Duchamp had a large role in his own enshrinement at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. He helped the Los Angeles collectors Walter and Louise Arensberg to form their outstanding holdings of modern art, including the largest, most

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The Modernist Émigrés in America

Dominic Bradbury– Migration has become one of the defining subjects of our time. It has helped to shape contemporary politics in both Europe and America, as well as other parts of the world, and has become a constant topic of debate. It is well worth taking a moment, given this

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Q&A with Jonathan Bell and Ellie Stathaki, authors of The New Urban House

Yale University Press: What was the selection and screening process like for selecting houses to feature? Jonathan Bell/Ellie Stathaki: The house book is a fairly well established publishing trope, something that has survived the coming of the internet and the explosion of interest in architectural design in all its forms,

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In conversation about sculpture: Richard Serra and Hal Foster

For your Friday afternoon (which also happens to be Richard Serra’s birthday!), here’s a slideshow of images from our new book Conversations about Sculpture by Richard Serra and Hal Foster.  It can accompany your reading of an illuminating excerpt from the book, which ran on Monday on artnet News, a

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Paul Rudolph at 100

The architect Paul Rudolph was born 100 years ago today.  Hugely influential in the 1950s and 1960s, Rudolph was among the most important architects of post-war modernism in America.  This Friday, October 26th, the Library of Congress will celebrate the centennial with a symposium that will include discussion of Rudolph’s

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An interview with John Klein, author of the new book Matisse and Decoration

Yale UP: What did “decoration” mean to Matisse? John Klein: Many times Matisse said or wrote that his main goal in making art was expression. He didn’t mean expressing emotions – anger, joy, fear, etc. Instead he meant that an artwork should convey the inner life of its artist in

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Le Corbusier’s drawings

Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, known as Le Corbusier (1887-1965), is famous for transforming 20th-century architecture and urbanism.  Less attention has been paid to his artistic production, though he began his career as a painter.  Beautifully illustrated with more than 300 drawings that have never before been published for an English readership, Le

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How an Epic Painting Became a Monumental Flop: The Perils of Art and Politics

Katie Hornstein — Powerful rulers have always relied on visual images to bolster their standing and seek public support for their military endeavors.  While these sorts of images can be broadly understood as propaganda, the question of their effectiveness as art in the service of power is anything but assured,

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Delirious New York, 40 years later

Martino Stierli– 2018 marks the 40th anniversary of the publication of Rem Koolhaas’s Delirious New York. The book, which has been in print continuously and is one of the best-selling architecture titles of the past 40 years, not only made its author instantly famous; it is also considered one of

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