Posts by artbooks

Ep. 78 – L.A. graffiti in a whole new light

Susan A. Phillips talks about her deeply researched study of Los Angeles graffiti that includes marks made by hobos, prisoners, pachucos, surfers, punks, grips, taggers, seafarers, and more. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | Soundcloud

Silence and Gordon Bunshaft

Nicholas Adams– At times, writing about the architect Gordon Bunshaft (1909–1990), former chief designer for the firm of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM), was like writing about a sulky teenager. Architects, of course, have lots of ways of talking. Philip Johnson was garrulous––people liked to say that he talked a

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A Personal Canon: Eric Mumford on Five Influential Texts

Here is my selection of five books that have defined and redefined urbanism since 1850… Camillo Sitte, City Building according to artistic principles (1889) As an arts and crafts educator in Vienna in the 1880s, concerned about what he saw as the soulless and mechanical extensions of European cities, Sitte

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A Personal Canon: Christina Weyl on Five Influential Texts

Here are five books that shaped the study of women printmakers active in the twentieth century. James Watrous, A Century of American Printmaking, 1880-1980 (1984) Watrous’s well-researched survey of American printmaking was the first book I accessed on the subject as an undergraduate, when writing my senior thesis at Georgetown.

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A Personal Canon: Stephen Houston on Five Influential Texts

Books can amuse, provoke, and uplift. The best ones are also, just a bit, like CRISPR technology. That breakthrough allows biochemists to edit genomes. Potent, lasting books reedit our minds.   For me, CRISPR works are not the writings that made a difference to Western art historians. Richard Stone and

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Ep. 77 – The beautiful, atmospheric art of Eileen Hogan

British artist Eileen Hogan, Yale Center for British Art curator Elisabeth Fairman, and Artists’ Lives oral historian Cathy Courtney have a wide-ranging conversation about painting, exhibitions, gardens, poetry, and more. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | Soundcloud

A Day at the Beach and Some Other Interesting Times at the 2019 Venice Biennale

By David Ebony  I. La Biennale di Venezia #58  The 2019 Venice Biennale, on view through November 24, has the head-scratching, ironic title “May You Live in Interesting Times.” The exhibition’s American-born, London-based curator Ralph Rugoff, director of the Hayward Gallery since 2006, says that the phrase has been invoked

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Ep. 76 – The complex relationship between Frank Lloyd Wright and New York City

Architectural historian Anthony Alofsin offers us an entirely new way of looking at role New York City played in the life and career of Frank Lloyd Wright — and a new way of looking at the city, as well. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | Soundcloud

New Perspectives on N. C. Wyeth

Well known during the twentieth century for his bold, imaginative illustrations that brought new characterizations to classic stories such as Treasure Island and The Boy’s King Arthur, N. C. Wyeth (1882–1945) vigorously pursued parallel interests in painting landscapes, seascapes, portraits, still lifes, murals and advertising images throughout his career. N.

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The Artist at Home with Her Art: Ruth Asawa

Interview with Tamara H. Schenkenberg by David Ebony   Japanese-American artist Ruth Asawa (1926-2013) is a unique figure in contemporary art. Her abstract sculptures, created with a novel, looped wire technique that resembles basket-weaving, are often misunderstood. For some, they embody the clash between craft and “fine art,” remaining uncertain as

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