Posts by Yale University Press

“The Recording Angel” Named One of 50 Greatest Music Books Ever

The Observer Music Monthly has just released its list of the 50 greatest music books ever, formed through consultation with its world-class music experts and readers. Included prominently on the list is Evan Eisenberg’s The Recording Angel: Music, Records and Culture from Aristotle to Zappa, with the following description: “How

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Palladio’s Rome

“With [Thomas] Jefferson I conversed at length on the subject of architecture — Palladio, he said, ‘was the Bible — you should get it and stick close to it.’” – Colonel Isaac A. Coles, 1816 Andrea di Pietro della Gondola (1508-1580)–better known by the name Palladio, after the Greek goddess

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Publishing Gone Digital

Digital publishing is much on the minds of publishers, authors, and readers these days, since Yale law professor Yochai Benkler came out with his new book The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom. In this comprehensive social theory of the Internet, Benkler describes how patterns of

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Karl Kraus: Apocalyptic Satirist

“The secret of the demagogue is to make himself as stupid as his audience so that they believe they are as clever as he.” – Karl Kraus If you’ve never heard of Karl Kraus, the Austrian satirist who inflicted withering and witty critiques on the mass media, the military-industrial complex,

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Proustmania

The Summer issue of BookForum features a number of new titles on Marcel Proust, including two by the acclaimed Proust biographer William C. Carter, whose Marcel Proust: A Life was named a New York Times Notable Book in 2000. Carter’s new Proust in Love portrays Proust’s amorous adventures and misadventures

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Profit with Honor

On Thursday last week, after a trial stretching four months and jury deliberations spanning six days, former Enron executives Kenneth Lay and Jeffrey Skilling were convicted of fraud and conspiracy, crimes for which they could face life sentences in prison. “The jury sent an unmistakable message,” prosecutor Sean Berkowitz said.

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Memorial Day

On Monday, May 29, Americans will observe Memorial Day, commemorating the U.S. men and women whose lives were lost, and continue to be lost, in military service for their country. The day marks a fitting occasion to look back at the wars which have defined our nation’s history and the

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Société Anonyme

“Traditions are beautiful–but to create them–not to follow.” – Franz Marc, motto of the Société Anonyme Before there was MoMA, there was the Société Anonyme, an organization founded in 1920 by Katherine S. Dreier, Marcel Duchamp, and Man Ray as America’s first “experimental museum” for contemporary art. Aiming to provide

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In Memoriam: Jaroslav Pelikan

“What you have received as an inheritance from your fathers, you must possess again in order to make it your own.” – Jaroslav Pelikan’s motto, from Goethe’s Faust Jaroslav Jan Pelikan, Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University and one of the foremost scholars on the history of Christianity,

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Crush Wins Triangle Award

The 18th annual Publishing Triangle Awards, honoring the best lesbian and gay fiction, non-fiction, and poetry published in 2005, were presented last week in New York City. The Thomas Gunn Award for Gay Poetry went to Richard Siken’s Crush. This is only the latest in the string of accolades Richard

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