Posts by Yale University Press

The Real Fidel Castro

Yesterday, Cuba’s government announced that its ruler, Fidel Castro, had survived intestinal surgery, but didn’t give any more details about his condition. On Monday evening, Castro, who will turn 80 on August 13, temporarily handed power to his brother, Raúl, before undergoing the surgery. After his surgery, Castro released a

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Lesch and the Lion

Last Thursday David Lesch, author of The New Lion of Damascus (Yale University Press, 2005), wrote an op-ed piece for the Washington Post on Syrian president Bashar al-Asad: Syrian President Bashar al-Asad has been a lonely man in international circles of late. Indeed, one of the few Americans with whom

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And the Emmy goes to…

The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences announced on July 18 that I’m Still Here, a documentary based on the diaries of young Holocaust victims, has been nominated for two Emmy Awards. The first category is Outstanding Historical Programming (Long Form), and the second is Outstanding Individual Achievement in

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Same, Different, Equal: Rethinking Single-Sex Schooling

In the coming weeks, the federal Department of Education is expected to issue final regulations allowing public school districts greater flexibility in establishing classes and schools that separate students on the basis of sex. The new rules will represent an about-face on federal interpretations of Title IX, the law prohibiting

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Why Conservatives Can’t Govern

Alan Wolfe, Professor of Political Science at Boston College and author of the forthcoming Does American Democracy Still Work? (Yale University Press; available September 4, 2006), has written the cover story for the July/August issue of Washington Monthly, entitled “Why Conservatives Can’t Govern.” The article, which has attracted significant attention

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The Artist’s Best Friend

It may be, as Alexander Pope once said, that “The proper study of mankind is man,” but, as is shown by an exhibition now on display at Greenwich’s Bruce Museum, an equally charming subject is man’s best friend. Best in Show: The Dog in Art from the Renaissance to Today

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“Le Tour de Bicycle”

The 93rd edition of the world’s premier cycling event, Le Tour de France, began last Saturday, July 1. Running until July 23, this year’s Tour will cover 20 stages (including a prologue) and more than 3,600 kilometers until, for the first time since 1999, a rider other than Lance Armstrong

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Mark Rothko in His Own Words

“I hate and distrust all art historians, experts, and critics,” Mark Rothko fulminated in 1959. “They are a bunch of parasites, feeding on the body of art. Their work not only is useless, it is misleading. They can say nothing worth listening to about art or the artist, aside from

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“The Recording Angel” Named One of 50 Greatest Music Books Ever

The Observer Music Monthly has just released its list of the 50 greatest music books ever, formed through consultation with its world-class music experts and readers. Included prominently on the list is Evan Eisenberg’s The Recording Angel: Music, Records and Culture from Aristotle to Zappa, with the following description: “How

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Palladio’s Rome

“With [Thomas] Jefferson I conversed at length on the subject of architecture — Palladio, he said, ‘was the Bible — you should get it and stick close to it.’” – Colonel Isaac A. Coles, 1816 Andrea di Pietro della Gondola (1508-1580)–better known by the name Palladio, after the Greek goddess

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