Posts by Yale University Press

Spies Like Us

Back when spies were spies, they spied by the rules—with the exception perhaps of those who did their spying for totalitarian regimes. The Constitution of the Soviet Union, for example, guaranteed the privacy of correspondence, but the government still read people’s private mail. By the end of the twentieth century,

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A Symphony of a Book

“An enthralling new book,” says the Boston Globe in its recent review of Composers’ Voices From Ives to Ellington: An Oral History of American Music, by Vivian Perlis and Libby Van Cleve. The book and the two-CD set that accompanies it present a host of interviews with and about the

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Languages of the World Unite

Just in time to coincide with the launch of the Bush Administration’s “Foreign Language Initiative,” Yale University Press has launched its new World Languages website. Unlike any other publisher, the Yale University Press language program publishes materials in both commonly taught and less commonly taught languages, including Arabic, Chinese, Kurdish,

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The Year of Cézanne

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the death of artist Paul Cézanne (1839-1906), the celebrated impressionist and one of the founders of the modern movement. The centenary will be commemorated by art exhibitions in Washington, D.C. and in Cézanne’s native Provence. “A bucolic escape from busier ports of call,

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Who am I? What am I doing here?

In an Op-Ed piece for the Washington Post, Harold Meyerson writes about “the pervasive insecurity that is inextricably part of today’s capitalism.” Invoking Richard Sennett’s new book The Culture of the New Capitalism, Myerson writes: “In the absence of a more structured work life, what Sennett sees is a more

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World Language Textbooks from Yale University Press Speak to Bush Plans

The Bush Administration just announced a substantial increase in funding for the study of foreign languages critical to national security, including Arabic and Chinese. “Much of the money reportedly will go to the Pentagon, to beef up language training at military schools,” said Elaine Korry on NPR’s Morning Edition, “but

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Imagining America

Imagining America: Icons of 20th Century American Art, will air on PBS this Wednesday, December 28, 2005, from 9:00-11:00 p.m. ET. The film is a journey through the transformations that took place in 20th-century America, told through the words and work of some of the century’s most significant artists. “Anybody

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Ben Franklin as Himself

“If Franklin were to mount a museum exhibition about himself,” writes Edward Rothstein in the New York Times, “it might very well resemble – in its variety, intelligence and pleasures – Benjamin Franklin: In Search of a Better World.” The exhibition, which just opened, will be on display at the

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A Touch of the Poet

“This distinguished production builds into a commandingly theatrical experience,” says David Rooney in his review of the Broadway revival of Eugene O’Neill’s A Touch of the Poet, now playing on Broadway for the first time in almost thirty years. The cast is led by Gabriel Byrne, who gives a “haunting

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A Little History Generates a Lot of Buzz

A Little History of the World continues to receive praise in publications across the country. The Los Angeles Times Book Review counts A Little History among the 20 titles in its Favorite Nonfiction Books of 2005 in its holiday roundup. The Raleigh News & Observer also names A Little History

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