Art & Architecture

Ep. 82 – How Photography Became Contemporary Art

As Michael S. Roth wrote in his review in The Washington Post, “The maturation of Grundberg as a renowned critic coincides with the maturation of photography as an art form and its conquest of the art market. With this fine book, he has given us a personal yet balanced account

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Joanna Hiffernan and James Whistler: The Model and the Artist

Margaret F. MacDonald— In 1861 Whistler wrote to his closest friend, Henri Fantin-Latour, about his work on Wapping (pictured above), and described the model, Joanna Hiffernan: “a girl who is jolly difficult to paint! … I have painted her three times and I do not want to get tired … …  I

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Medieval Artists Painted Such Things? Images that Surprise and Delight in Illuminated World Chronicles

Nina Rowe— In the century between roughly 1330 and 1430, books known today as illuminated World Chronicles were in vogue among the upper ranks in the cities of Bavaria and Austria. Created before the era when print became widespread in Europe, these manuscript volumes were richly illustrated with hand-painted images,

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Ep. 81 – Alice Neel’s Deep Humanism

In a fascinating conversation that ranges from Alice Neel’s politics to her painting practice, we talk with Kelly Baum and Randall Griffey, the co-curators of the current exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and co-editors of the related catalogue, Alice Neel: People Come First. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Stitcher

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Swing Landscape: A Conversation on 1930s Abstract Mural Paintings

Last year Yale University Press was pleased to publish two illuminating studies of 1930s public murals: Swing Landscape: Stuart Davis and the Modernist Mural (selected as Outstanding Exhibition Catalogue of 2020 by the Midwest Art History Society) and Modernism for the Masses: Painters, Politics, and Public Murals in 1930s New York.

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The Intimate Art of Sol LeWitt

David S. Areford— Sol LeWitt. For the dedicated or even occasional museum visitor, the artist’s name conjures up expansive and colorful murals (his “wall drawings”) and equally commanding, large-scale cubic sculptures (his “structures”). Often installed in grand public interior or exterior settings, these artworks collaborate with the architectural and spatial

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Changeability for Survival: Sanford Biggers’s Codeswitch

Interview with the artist by David Ebony Sanford Biggers is a multifaceted, multi-talented artist with a singular, global vision. A major touring museum solo of works by the Los Angeles-born (1970), New York-based artist, Codeswitch features some sixty large-scale “quilt paintings,” as well as a number of relief constructions, and videos. Scheduled to

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A Personal Canon: Jennifer A. Pruitt on Five Influential Texts

In my work, I strive to understand how diverse populations of people used and experienced architecture in the medieval Islamic world. The texts I have chosen for my personal canon explore these cultural interactions, bringing the complexity of medieval humanity to life. The Cairo Geniza The Cairo Geniza, which is

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… in which Nick Mauss answers some questions about Transmissions

Transmissions is an installation, a collage of several art forms, a revisionist investigation of New York modernism and sexual expression, and an essay in queer theory…. The juxtapositions show that Transmissions is a work of creative imagination as much as revelation. You go to sample it as history, you absorb

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Fur: A Sensitive History

Jonathan Faiers— Fur Thinking In 1963, as part of a publicity stunt, World Heavyweight Boxing Champion Sonny Liston had a pair of boxing gloves made from mink.  The gloves were used during press interviews between Liston and newcomer Muhammad Ali (then still known as Cassius Clay), the joke being that

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