Art & Architecture

A meditation by writer Adania Shibli on the art of Mona Hatoum

Six Key Movements to Unlock a Possible History of Materials Adania Shibli It is embedded in the silence of the spaces in which her works are mounted, as well as in the murmur of those walking around them: “Each person is free to understand what I do in the light

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Illuminating the Void: Gordon Matta-Clark’s Urban Interventions

Interview with Bronx Museum curator Antonio Sergio Bessa By David Ebony In recent years, I have been periodically spending time away from the city, in a rural area in upstate New York. It’s a pleasure to be closer to nature after many years as a city dweller. Gardening is a

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Ep. 50 – The Art of Libation in Classical Athens

Explore the prevalence and the significance of images of liquids being poured from vessels in the fascinating and beautiful artworks of 5th century Athens. Yale associate professor Milette Gaifman, with a joint appointment in the Departments of Classics and History of Art, is perfectly situated to discuss what it is the

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Bridge of Spies

Molly Haskell— Bridge of Spies, Spielberg’s 2015 Cold War thriller and Academy Award nominee, is based on the exchange of prisoners following the 1960 U-2 incident. Full of meticulous period details, with dark rain-slick streets, reliably beautiful in the silver, blue-gray tones of Janusz Kaminski’s cinematography, the movie, like so

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Ep. 49 – Picasso and Drawing

Drawing serves as a vital thread connecting artist Pablo Picasso’s entire body of work. Christopher Lloyd – former Surveyor of The Queen’s Pictures in the British Royal Collection – talks to George Miller about Picasso’s drawings, tracing the artist’s lifelong achievement as a draughtsman. Subscribe: iTunes | Stitcher | Soundcloud

Ep. 43 – The Untold Story of a Midcentury Modern Architect

An interview with Dale Gyure about architect Minoru Yamasaki, whose projects include the original World Trade Center.

Brazil’s First Art Cannibal: Tarsila do Amaral

Interview with curators Stephanie D’Alessandro and Luis Pérez-Oramas by David Ebony The paintings of Brazilian artist Tarsila do Amaral (1886-1973)—simply known as Tarsila—and the theory of Anthropophagy, or the philosophy of “cultural cannibalism,” introduced in 1928 by Tarsila’s first husband, Brazilian poet Oswald de Andrade (1890-1954), were for me a

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Art Can Help

Since taking up photography in the mid-1960s, Robert Adams (b. 1937) has quietly become one of the most influential visual chroniclers of the evolving American landscape. Before turning full-time to photography in the 1970s, Adams was a literature professor, and in a recently published collection of inspiring essays, he reminds

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“Undoing a building” with Gordon Matta-Clark

Antonio Sergio Bessa– In his foreword to the 2007 Whitney catalogue, museum director Adam Weinberg wrote with great insight that Gordon Matta-Clark’s work “resisted commodification and the museum context.” I would add that to counter the tendency to commodify, the experiential element in presenting his work is of utmost importance. 

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The World Is Never Sane: Delirious with Author Kelly Baum

From our colleagues at The Metropolitan Museum of Art comes an interview between Rachel High, Publishing and Marketing Assistant in the Met’s editorial department, and Kelly Baum, curator of an exhibition on the art and history of delirium from 1950 to 1980, which is on view at the Met Breuer

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