Art & Architecture

Ep. 83 – A Conversation About American Artist Joseph E. Yoakum

In this episode of the Yale University Press podcast, we talk about the life and drawings of the self-taught artist Joseph E. Yoakum with the Art Institute of Chicago‘s Mark Pascale and MoMA‘s Esther Adler, two of the curators of the current traveling retrospective exhibition of the artist’s work and

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Baldessari’s Last Series

Patrick Pardo— The sixth and final volume of the John Baldessari Catalogue Raisonné covers the years 2011 through 2019. It was published in late January 2021, roughly a year after Baldessari’s death on January 2, 2020, at the age of 88.  Thirty canvases comprise John Baldessari’s “Space Between” series, which he had

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Robert Walser and the Russian Ballet

Susan Bernofsky— In the spring of 1909, thirty-one-year-old novelist Robert Walser, then living in Berlin, saw a performance by one of the greatest ballet dancers of the twentieth century. Anna Pavlova wasn’t yet the international star she would later become, though she was already a lead dancer with the Maryinsky

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Sounding Alma Thomas

Jonathan Frederick Walz— Perspicacious art historian Melissa Ho—who, in her role as curator of twentieth-century art at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, oversees the largest public collection of Alma Thomas paintings on canvas—describes the artist’s output as “sensorially rich work that engages sound and touch as well as vision.” Vivid,

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Travel, Photography, and the (Familiar) New

Monica Bravo– After a long period of staying at home, social distancing, and masking up, we are told—at last—that the world is opening up. Breathing a collective sigh of relief (one that still does not extend to every community worldwide, I hasten to add), many are rushing to once again

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Why Feminist Artists Found an Ally in Antonin Artaud

Lucy Bradnock— Instances of feminist artists citing Artaud are curious and not a little confusing. The French poet and dramaturg died in 1948, leaving behind a legacy that was both bound up in historical modernism and dogged by accusations of misogyny. Neither would seem to align him with second wave

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Sol LeWitt: In All Directions (Part 2)

In the introduction to Locating Sol LeWitt, editor David Areford advocates for a “plural LeWitt,” that is, a more expansive view of the artist and his practice, one that fully embraces the multiple mediums he pursued and the sometimes difficult and contradictory aspects of his conceptual art. In this spirit, the

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Sol LeWitt: In All Directions (Part 1)

In the introduction to Locating Sol LeWitt, editor David Areford advocates for a “plural LeWitt,” that is, a more expansive view of the artist and his practice, one that fully embraces the multiple mediums he pursued and the sometimes difficult and contradictory aspects of his conceptual art. In this spirit, the

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On the Viewing Platform: The Panorama and its Afterlives

Katie Trumpener– “Panoramas”, gigantic paintings in the round, were first created and exhibited in Britain in 1792. Rapidly taken up across Europe, then around the world, they remained a central nineteenth-century art form–and an equally crucial (if sometimes spectral) force in twentieth-century visual culture. Indeed, the recent book On the

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Metro Pictures, Gallery of the Pictures Generation, Calls it Quits

Andy Grundberg– The announcement that Metro Pictures will close its gallery in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York at the end of the year emphatically signals – if any emphasis were needed – the end of an era of contemporary art. One could call it Postmodernism’s swan song, but it’s

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