Author Posts

Kentucky Renaissance: A Story told Through Photography

Brian Sholis– I first became aware of the creative life that flourished in mid-twentieth-century Lexington, Kentucky, around 2001. In quick succession I discovered Guy Davenport’s writing and Ralph Eugene Meatyard’s photographs. As I embarked on a career as a writer on art, Davenport’s essay collections became a touchstone. I was

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Vito Acconci and the Body as Medium

Elise Archias’s new book, The Concrete Body: Yvonne Rainer, Carolee Schneemann, Vito Acconci, examines the 1960s performance work of these three New York artists who adapted modernist approaches to form for the medium of the human body, finding parallels between the tactility of a drip of paint and a body’s

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Everywhen: The Eternal Present in Indigenous Art From Australia

Stephen Gilchrist— My great-grandmother Dolly Bidgemia was said to be 121 years old when she died. However, she never made the Guinness World Records, because at her birth, her name was never recorded in any book. She was born in Yamatji country in Australia’s northwest, where my mother’s family is from.

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Lowlands Travelogue: Leiden

In Elisabeth de Bièvre’s book Dutch Art and Urban Culture, 1200-1700, the author explains how distinct geographical circumstances and histories shaped unique urban developments in different locations in the Netherlands and, in turn, fundamentally informed the art and visual culture of individual cities.  In seven chapters, each devoted to a single city, the

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Seeing double

Taking its title from a 1961 work by Robert Rauschenberg—a telegram that stated, “This is a portrait of Iris Clert if I say so”—this groundbreaking book and exhibition, which opens today at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, trace the history of portraiture as a site of radical artistic experimentation, as

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The technical brilliance and self-expression of William Merritt Chase

A century after his death, the breadth and richness of American painter William Merritt Chase’s career are celebrated in a beautifully illustrated book, William Merritt Chase: A Modern Master, by Elsa Smithgall, Erica E. Hirshler, Katherine M. Bourguignon, Giovanna Ginex, and John Davis, and with a foreword by D. Frederick Baker. The

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Apethorpe – a house fit for kings, and queens

To mark the Queen’s birthday parade on June 11th, architectural historian Kathryn Morrison, author of Apethorpe: The Story of an English Country House, has written a marvelously entertaining guest post recounting a “royal progress” that saw kings and queens from James I through to George IV visiting this fascinating and architecturally significant

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Never Again War: Käthe Kollwitz in America

The work of German printmaker and sculptor Käthe Kollwitz (1867–1945) was celebrated through two recent exhibitions: the first was held at the Davis Museum at Wellesley College in Fall 2015 and the second at the Smith College Museum of Art in Spring 2016. The accompanying book titled Käthe Kollwitz and the

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The European Migrant Crisis of 1789

Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell and her splendid new book Fashion Victims: Dress at the Court of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette will be honored with the Millia Davenport Publication Award tomorrow, Friday, May 27th at the 42nd annual Costume Society of America Meeting and Symposium in Cleveland, Ohio.  She’s written a guest post for us

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Mother-daughter Haute Couture

 How a designer’s love for her daughter changed children’s wear Emmanuelle Dirix– These days, coordinating mother-daughter outfits have an uneven reputation, but at the start of the 20th century, matching clothing for moms and their daughters became de rigueur among the Parisian fashion elite and international haute couture clients. The vogue for these

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