Art & Architecture

Of Peaches, Pears, and Politics

Patricia Mainardi– Traviès’s 1831 lithograph shows a man gesturing towards a display of caricatures while saying “You have to admit that the head of state looks pretty funny”. It could serve as a banner for all political cartooning, an art that is at its best in difficult times. Simply put,

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The Joys of Being a Natural History Artist

Debby Kaspari— I’m a natural history artist, and try to draw and paint from living animals whenever possible. Some of what I do in the field might turn out to be finished art, and some of it will become raw material for studio works. But making the art is only

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Spotlight on Josef and Anni Albers

Ivy Sanders Schneider– Josef Albers was a hugely influential German-born American artist and educator. This week — between March 19th, the day he was born in 1888, and March 25, the day he died eighty-eight years later — we highlight aspects of his life to commemorate his work and enduring legacy. Josef

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A Multimedia Exploration of Thomas Wilfred’s Art of Light

“[G]limmers of unfathomable light” … a “yolk-colored blob” … “a sensuous array of abstract composition moving in suspended and unknowable sequence” … “vivid tendrils and clouds, soaring and seeping like magma” … “bruises seen in time-lapse”. All of these descriptions represent attempts to capture in words the strange beauty of

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William H. Gerdts on Two Centuries of American Still-Life Painting

As many who are attentive to art world goings-on are aware, collectors Frank and Michelle Hevrdejs recently promised to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, a trove of spectacular still lifes by American artists; the works span the years from 1817 to 2012.  A book on the collection, Two Centuries

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An interview with Dana Miller, curator of Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight

Ivy Sanders Schneider– Carmen Herrera, who will celebrate her 102nd birthday this year, is finally a household name. Born in Havana, Cuba, Herrera has lived and worked in New York for over sixty years, but sold her first piece of art in 2002. She had her first major retrospective last

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On His Way to The Met: Max Beckmann in New York with Sabine Rewald

From our colleagues at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, here’s a great interview between Rachel High, Publishing and Marketing Assistant in the Met’s editorial department, and Sabine Rewald, curator of the exhibition Max Beckmann in New York, which you can still see until February 20th, 2017. New York energized the German

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Podcast: Anni and Josef Albers and the art they collected

Anni and Josef Albers were two of the most influential figures of 20th-century modernism. Anni was a textile artist, and Josef was a professor and artist in glass, metal, wood, and photography, in addition to being the creator of one of the most important explanations of color theory principles, The

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James S. Ackerman: Origins, Invention, Revision

On the last day of 2016, we lost one of the world’s foremost architectural historians when James Sloss Ackerman died at age 97.  Ackerman was a consummate, and widely esteemed, academic, whose rigorous method set architecture in the broader contexts of cultural and intellectual history. He was  a Fellow of

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Cuba Libre: Art in Tumultuous Times; Interview with Abigail McEwen by David Ebony

David Ebony– Revolutionary Horizons: Art and Polemics in 1950s Cuba, a new book by University of Maryland professor and Latin American art scholar Abigail McEwen, could hardly have appeared at a more opportune moment. Cuba is everywhere in the news lately. President Barack Obama’s visit to Cuba last March, the

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