Current Affairs

Has ISIS Won the Digital War?

Philippe Joseph-Salazar— First, let us remember that terrifying images of throat-slitting are not new. The atrocity of which our discourse community is (not) aware is more than a decade old: It did not begin with the execution of the American journalist James Foley, beheaded on prime time in August 2014.

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Ep. 36 – The Challenges of Being a Social Media Star

The road to social media stardom is difficult and rarely pays well. Brooke Erin Duffy shares stories of success and offers advice and a warning for those looking to make it big. http://traffic.libsyn.com/yaleuniversitypresspodcast/2017-9-21-Social-Media-Careers.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS

The Practicalities of Presidential Prosecution

Brian C. Kalt— Practicalities As they were designing the presidency, the delegates at the Constitutional Convention in 1787 discussed hypothetical criminal presidents. In recent decades—the era of the independent counsel—things have gotten less hypothetical, with serious investigations affecting Presidents Nixon, Reagan, Bush, Clinton, and Bush. Nixon and Clinton came closest

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Equal Rights in President Donald Trump’s America

Richard D. Brown— “We are a nation founded on the truth that all of us are created equal,” President Trump just declared. “We are equal,” he said, “in the eyes of our creator, we are equal under the law, and we are equal under our Constitution.”  These words are true. 

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Ep. 23 – How Retailers Strip Your Privacy

Your personal data isn’t safe even when you shop offline. Retailers are tracking your behavior and evaluating your value as a customer in physical stores. Privacy expert and author Joseph Turow discusses the ways they are doing this and what you can do to protect your privacy. http://traffic.libsyn.com/yaleuniversitypresspodcast/2017-4-20-Retailers-Strip-Privacy.mp3Podcast: Play in

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ISIS, Christianity, and the Pact of Umar

David J. Wasserstein— When ISIS forces took the Iraqi city of Mosul in the summer of 2014, and later on when they took Raqqa in Syria, they did not kill all the Christians. Instead they made them sign on to a curious set of conditions. Christians were allowed to maintain

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The Limits of Tolerance

Emily Katz Anhalt— The ancient Greeks were open-minded without being tolerant. They didn’t devise the world’s first-ever democracy by tolerating everything. Their unprecedented transition from tribalism to civil society derived from their eagerness to ask questions and their determination to judge others and themselves critically. Open-mindedness and the desire to

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Rethinking American Religion in the Age of Trump

Mark Oppenheimer— When I published Knocking on Heaven’s Door: American Religion in the Age of Counterculture, in 2003, the field of the 1960s was still relatively under-studied, the field of American religion in the 1960s in particular. Flying somewhat blind, I made the argument that the revolution in American religion in

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Ep. 34 – Foreign Policy for a Networked World

Anne-Marie Slaughter discusses foreign policy and the roles governments and individuals can play in an increasingly networked world. http://traffic.libsyn.com/yaleuniversitypresspodcast/2017-8-3-Slaughter.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS

The Federalist Papers: On Impeachment

Sanford Levinson— Federalist 65: The Senate’s Confirmation and Impeachment Powers One of the most important distinction between the Senate and House, with regard to their constitutionally granted powers, concerns the former’s unique role in confirming presidential appointments. It is utterly irrelevant, as a formal matter, what the House thinks about

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