Political Science

Same, Different, Equal: Rethinking Single-Sex Schooling

In the coming weeks, the federal Department of Education is expected to issue final regulations allowing public school districts greater flexibility in establishing classes and schools that separate students on the basis of sex. The new rules will represent an about-face on federal interpretations of Title IX, the law prohibiting

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Why Conservatives Can’t Govern

Alan Wolfe, Professor of Political Science at Boston College and author of the forthcoming Does American Democracy Still Work? (Yale University Press; available September 4, 2006), has written the cover story for the July/August issue of Washington Monthly, entitled “Why Conservatives Can’t Govern.” The article, which has attracted significant attention

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Profit with Honor

On Thursday last week, after a trial stretching four months and jury deliberations spanning six days, former Enron executives Kenneth Lay and Jeffrey Skilling were convicted of fraud and conspiracy, crimes for which they could face life sentences in prison. “The jury sent an unmistakable message,” prosecutor Sean Berkowitz said.

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Memorial Day

On Monday, May 29, Americans will observe Memorial Day, commemorating the U.S. men and women whose lives were lost, and continue to be lost, in military service for their country. The day marks a fitting occasion to look back at the wars which have defined our nation’s history and the

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The End Justifies the Green

What do The Godfather, The Cat in the Hat, and Machiavelli’s The Prince have in common? According to Stanley Bing in this weekend’s Wall Street Journal, they are among the five books that offer the soundest advice for proper business etiquette. Before your eyes roll too far into the back

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“America at the Crossroads” in the Limelight

Francis Fukuyama’s new book, America at the Crossroads: Democracy, Power, and the Neoconservative Legacy, was featured on the cover of this past weekend’s edition of the New York Times Book Review. “Fukuyama is always worth reading,” the reviewer concludes, “and his new book contains ideas that I hope the non-neoconservatives

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Interview with Matthew Levitt

Matthew Levitt, author of the forthcoming book Hamas: Politics, Charity, and Terrorism in the Service of the Jihad, was interviewed last week by the Washington-based Council on Foreign Relations. Levitt, who wrote his book while serving as senior fellow and director of terrorism studies at the Washington Institute for Near

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Before the Next Attack: Preserving Civil Liberties in an Age of Terrorism

An editorial in today’s New York Times states, “[President] Bush’s decision after 9/11 that he had the power to put prisoners beyond the reach of the law at his choosing was the first attempt to suspend habeas corpus on American territory since the Civil War.” It continues: The retired Justice

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Kakutani on Fukuyama

In the latest review of America at the Crossroads, Michiko Kakutani writes in the New York Times that Francis Fukuyama, “serves up a powerful indictment of the Bush administration’s war in Iraq and the role that neoconservative ideas — concerning preventive war, benevolent hegemony and unilateral action — played in

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Death of a Monster

Slobodan Milosevic, the former Serbian leader who was on trial for crimes against humanity at the International Criminal Tribunal in The Hague, died in his prison cell on Saturday, apparently from a heart attack. Known in the U.S. as “the butcher of the Balkans,” Milosevic orchestrated a decade of violence

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