Medieval & Renaissance History

Happy 444th Birthday, Will!

“When we are born we cry that we are come… to this great stage of fools,” William Shakespeare once wrote. Well, 444 years ago today, Shakespeare entered this great stage of fools and made a little more sense out of it. To learn about how he did this, check out

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Panel at Yale in honor of Nuttall’s Shakespeare the Thinker

Shakespeare’s inner thought process will be the subject of a panel discussion held at Yale tomorrow, October 30. “Shakespeare the Thinker” will be at 4:30 p.m., in the Yale Center for British Art Lecture Hall, 1080 Chapel Street. The panel is free and open to the public. Among the notable

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NYT: Tapestry in the Baroque is “stupefying” and “awesome”

In today’s New York Times, Holland Cotter lauded “Tapestry in the Baroque: Threads of Splendor,” a new exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Cotter called the exhibition “awesome in its exacting detail” and “a demonstration of beauty of a very particular and surprisingly personal kind.” The epic tapestries, she

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Yale University Press author wins 2007 Otto Gründler Prize

Charles B. McClendon’s book The Origins of Medieval Architecture: Building in Europe, A.D. 600-900 has won the 2007 Otto Gründler Prize sponsored by Western Michigan University. Presented at the annual International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Otto Gründler Prize is awarded to the author of a book or monograph judged

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Yale University presents 24-hr Shakespeare Marathon

A 24-hr Shakespeare marathon, the first of its kind at Yale Unversity, will be held this weekend at the Old Campus. According to the Yale Daily News, a full reading of all of his 39 plays, 5 narrative poems and 154 sonnets will be performed and read on campus. A

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Set in Stone

Roberta Smith reviewed “Set in Stone: The Medieval Face in Sculpture” in the New York Times today. The exhibit is currently on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and will run until February 18, 2007. From the review: “Set in Stone: The Face in Medieval Sculpture” is one of

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Palladio’s Rome

“With [Thomas] Jefferson I conversed at length on the subject of architecture — Palladio, he said, ‘was the Bible — you should get it and stick close to it.’” – Colonel Isaac A. Coles, 1816 Andrea di Pietro della Gondola (1508-1580)–better known by the name Palladio, after the Greek goddess

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The End Justifies the Green

What do The Godfather, The Cat in the Hat, and Machiavelli’s The Prince have in common? According to Stanley Bing in this weekend’s Wall Street Journal, they are among the five books that offer the soundest advice for proper business etiquette. Before your eyes roll too far into the back

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A Little History Generates a Lot of Buzz

A Little History of the World continues to receive praise in publications across the country. The Los Angeles Times Book Review counts A Little History among the 20 titles in its Favorite Nonfiction Books of 2005 in its holiday roundup. The Raleigh News & Observer also names A Little History

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Yale Books for the Holidays

Four Yale University Press titles appear in the New York Times Book Review Holiday Books issue. Stephen Heller calls Masters of American Comics, “a smartly designed, comprehensive history of 20th-century comics.”  Read the full review. Looking at Atget is included in a selection of recent books evoking a romantic vision

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