Medieval & Renaissance History

To London, with Love: Bloody Mary Summer

Ivan Lett– When Emperor Charles V was elected Holy Roman Emperor in June 1519, his influential position became incredibly important for the strength of his family. Only three years before, he had inherited the vast lands of the Spanish Empire, which already spanned the far ends of the globe, and

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The Modern Age of Books

Books, often carriers of cultural history, also have a cultural history of their own. The book has played a different role in each culture and era. The Book in the Renaissance, by Andrew Pettegree, examines the first 150 years after the invention of print. As it were, books played more

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The social economics of the spice trade

Tuesday’s episode of NPR’s Planet Money features an extended piece on the booming spice economy of the Middle Ages, which seems to hold some of the earliest lessons in global economics. Always in high demand in the West, spices were not only used to enliven the bland European cuisine of

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The American Play and The Tainted Muse in review

“Some people make history; others make history interesting.” So begins a two-page spread in the October issue of Dramatics Magazine featuring two recent highlights from Yale’s drama list, Marc Robinson‘s The American Play and Robert Brustein‘s The Tainted Muse. Produced by the Educational Theatre Association and oriented toward practitioners in

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Happy (belated) National Library Week!

Last week was National Library Week, and though we’re a little late to the party, Yale Press has a number of titles to help bibliophiles continue exploring this year’s theme: “Worlds connect @ your library.” “Libraries,” Alberto Manguel says, “have always seemed to me pleasantly mad places, and for as

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Happy 444th Birthday, Will!

“When we are born we cry that we are come… to this great stage of fools,” William Shakespeare once wrote. Well, 444 years ago today, Shakespeare entered this great stage of fools and made a little more sense out of it. To learn about how he did this, check out

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Panel at Yale in honor of Nuttall’s Shakespeare the Thinker

Shakespeare’s inner thought process will be the subject of a panel discussion held at Yale tomorrow, October 30. “Shakespeare the Thinker” will be at 4:30 p.m., in the Yale Center for British Art Lecture Hall, 1080 Chapel Street. The panel is free and open to the public. Among the notable

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NYT: Tapestry in the Baroque is “stupefying” and “awesome”

In today’s New York Times, Holland Cotter lauded “Tapestry in the Baroque: Threads of Splendor,” a new exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Cotter called the exhibition “awesome in its exacting detail” and “a demonstration of beauty of a very particular and surprisingly personal kind.” The epic tapestries, she

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Yale University Press author wins 2007 Otto Gründler Prize

Charles B. McClendon’s book The Origins of Medieval Architecture: Building in Europe, A.D. 600-900 has won the 2007 Otto Gründler Prize sponsored by Western Michigan University. Presented at the annual International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Otto Gründler Prize is awarded to the author of a book or monograph judged

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Yale University presents 24-hr Shakespeare Marathon

A 24-hr Shakespeare marathon, the first of its kind at Yale Unversity, will be held this weekend at the Old Campus. According to the Yale Daily News, a full reading of all of his 39 plays, 5 narrative poems and 154 sonnets will be performed and read on campus. A

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