History

The Federalist Papers: On Impeachment

Sanford Levinson— Federalist 65: The Senate’s Confirmation and Impeachment Powers One of the most important distinction between the Senate and House, with regard to their constitutionally granted powers, concerns the former’s unique role in confirming presidential appointments. It is utterly irrelevant, as a formal matter, what the House thinks about

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Sorkin on the Racing Line

Clive James— Both The Sopranos and Band of Brothers were HBO cable productions, and their collective impact might tend to persuade us that network television was left nowhere. But it’s a law of the arts that a stylistic innovation gets instantly everywhere, like heat or cold; and in fact, even while HBO

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Gore Vidal: Some After Words

On July 31, 2012, Gore Vidal died at his home in in the Hollywood Hills section of Los Angeles, where he had moved in 2003, the same year that Yale University Press published his acute observations on our founding fathers in the acclaimed Inventing a Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson. In The

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Before and After Apollo

Bernd Brunner— History often rewards great breakthroughs but ignores the preparatory steps that made those achievements possible. The Apollo program, for instance, has been documented in great detail and still receives ample attention, but what of the extraordinary labors that led to that summit? How was flight to the moon

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Ep. 33 – Dickens, Darwin, Disraeli, and the Great Stink of 1858

The summer of 1858 was hot and stinky in London and filled with stories and scandals. http://traffic.libsyn.com/yaleuniversitypresspodcast/2017-7-20-London-Summer-1858.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS

Why Are We Still Reading Jane Austen (But Not Mary Brunton)?

H. J. Jackson— Up to 1860, the career paths of Jane Austen and Mary Brunton were strikingly similar. If Brunton had an advantage in the reviews and reference books, Austen—who after all produced more novels—gradually took the lead in numbers of editions and reprints. Almost exact contemporaries, they both started

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Ep. 32 – The Nazi Obsession with the Occult

The Nazi obsession with the occult and supernatural is well-known in pop culture. Eric Kurlander gives us the real story beyond what we’ve seen in Hollywood and comics. http://traffic.libsyn.com/yaleuniversitypresspodcast/2017-7-13-Nazi-Occult.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS

Jupiter, Ho!

Jon Willis— Galileo entered Jupiter orbit on December 8, 1989, just one day after the drama and revelations of the descent probe. Although Galileo was a Jupiter orbiter, the proximity of Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto offered the opportunity for multiple flybys of the Galilean satellites. During its eight-year mission to Jupiter, Galileo completed thirty-five

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Ep. 3 – Understanding Russia

Russia expert David Satter talks about the fall of Yeltsin, the rise of Putin, and what lies ahead for Russia and the United States. (This episode originally aired 5/26/2016) http://traffic.libsyn.com/yaleuniversitypresspodcast/2016-5-26-Understanding-Russia.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS

Disraeli, de Rothschild, and the Struggle to Admit Jews to Parliament

Rosemary Ashton— What was it like to live in London through one of the hottest summers on record, with the River Thames emitting a sickening smell as a result of the sewage of over two million inhabitants being discharged into the river and floating up and down with the tide, never

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