History

Cartoons from the Kremlin

How did the rulers of the Soviet Union pass the time during long Politburo meetings in the Kremlin? They doodled. Sketching on notebook pages, official letterheads, and the margins of draft documents, prominent Soviet leaders in the 1920s and 1930s amused themselves and their colleagues with drawings of one another.

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The Late Republic?

In today’s Wall Street Journal, Mark Miller writes, “There are points of similarity between the political culture of late republican Rome and our own, but the differences reveal how far we have to go before we hit bottom — contrary to the dire warnings emanating from certain political quarters today.”

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Hannah Arendt and the Study of Evil

Listen to Elisabeth Young-Bruehl, author of Why Arendt Matters, discuss Hannah Arendt, her examination of totalitarianism, and the “banality of evil,” on NPR’s All Things Considered.

Why Arendt Matters

Saturday, October 14, marks the centennial of the birth of Hannah Arendt (1906-1975), the German-born political philosopher whose analysis of the nature of power, totalitarianism, and the “banality of evil” still resonates powerfully in our own time. “So it is no accident,” says Edward Rothstein in the New York Times,

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Hail, Caesar!

If you haven’t heard it already, tune in to Tom Ashbrook’s conversation with Adrian Goldsworthy on NPR’s On Point. From the On Point website: “Hail, Caesar!” they still cry in the movies as once they saluted in the heart of ancient Rome and on battlefields from Gaul to Syria. Julius

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Rethinking Resurrection

Only rarely in biblical scholarship does a book come along that topples a monolith of scholarly consensus. Resurrection and the Restoration of Israel: The Ultimate Victory of the God of Life, a new book by Harvard professor Jon D. Levenson that explores the origins of the Jewish notion of the

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Set in Stone

Roberta Smith reviewed “Set in Stone: The Medieval Face in Sculpture” in the New York Times today. The exhibit is currently on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and will run until February 18, 2007. From the review: “Set in Stone: The Face in Medieval Sculpture” is one of

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More Royal Maneuvering

“Though Thailand is a constitutional monarchy and the king has only limited formal political power, he is highly influential and is revered by the Thai public after more than 5o years on the throne. Armored vehicles seen moving in the capital bore ribbons of bright yellow, a color associated with

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Bartlett’s, Step Aside

The Yale Book of Quotations, compiled by Fred R. Shapiro, is due out in October. But “aren’t there already books of quotations out there?” the review in Yale Alumni Magazine asks. “Do we need another? “Fred Shapiro’s answer is Yes, and yes. There are people who pick up Bartlett’s Familiar

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In the Studio…

Here is a sneak peek at In the Studio: Visits with Contemporary Cartoonists by Todd Hignite, the founding editor of Comic Art Magazine. In the Studio will be available in September. 2.03 Art Spiegelman, detail from “High Art Lowdown,” Artforum, December 1990. Copyright © 1990 by Art Spiegelman. 6.26 Daniel

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