History

Sketches from a Secret War

Aspiring artist turned intelligence operative, powerful statesman, and underground activist, Henryk Józewski was an instrumental figure in the battle for Polish independence during the tumultuous decades of the early and mid twentieth century. He put down his paintbrush long enough to direct Polish intelligence in Ukraine, govern the borderland region

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In Memoriam: William Sloane Coffin, Jr.

“The world is too dangerous for anything but truth and too small for anything but love.” – William Sloane Coffin, Jr. The Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr., a magnet for controversy, the media, and followers, and the premier voice of northern religious liberalism for more than a quarter-century, died yesterday

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The Revenge of Thomas Eakins

Thomas Eakins was misunderstood in life, his brilliant work earned little acclaim, and hidden demons tortured and drove him. Yet the portraits he painted more than a century ago captivate us today, and he is now widely acclaimed as the finest portrait painter our nation has ever produced. The Revenge

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“America at the Crossroads” in the Limelight

Francis Fukuyama’s new book, America at the Crossroads: Democracy, Power, and the Neoconservative Legacy, was featured on the cover of this past weekend’s edition of the New York Times Book Review. “Fukuyama is always worth reading,” the reviewer concludes, “and his new book contains ideas that I hope the non-neoconservatives

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Interview with Matthew Levitt

Matthew Levitt, author of the forthcoming book Hamas: Politics, Charity, and Terrorism in the Service of the Jihad, was interviewed last week by the Washington-based Council on Foreign Relations. Levitt, who wrote his book while serving as senior fellow and director of terrorism studies at the Washington Institute for Near

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Finding Support in Male-Dominated Fields

If I’m not busy every second of every day, it seems that I’m not working hard enough.  Maybe having a fulfilling personal life is incompatible with a successful career.   I feel like an emotional cafeteria, responding to what others want.  I feel responsible for everything but have no power

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Dwelling Place Wins Prestigious Bancroft Prize

Columbia University recently announced the winners of the 2006 Bancroft Prize in American History.  Yale University Press is pleased to announce that one of this year’s recipients is Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epic by Erskine Clarke. Encompassing the years 1805 to 1869, Dwelling Place brings to life the simultaneous but

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Before the Next Attack: Preserving Civil Liberties in an Age of Terrorism

An editorial in today’s New York Times states, “[President] Bush’s decision after 9/11 that he had the power to put prisoners beyond the reach of the law at his choosing was the first attempt to suspend habeas corpus on American territory since the Civil War.” It continues: The retired Justice

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Dwelling Place Wins Bancroft Prize

It was announced this week that Erskine Clarke’s Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epic, a narrative history of four generations of a plantation’s inhabitants–white and black–in Liberty County, Georgia, from 1805 to 1869, is among this year’s winners of the prestigious Bancroft Prize. The Bancroft Prize, established in 1948, is awarded

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Kakutani on Fukuyama

In the latest review of America at the Crossroads, Michiko Kakutani writes in the New York Times that Francis Fukuyama, “serves up a powerful indictment of the Bush administration’s war in Iraq and the role that neoconservative ideas — concerning preventive war, benevolent hegemony and unilateral action — played in

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