Humanities

Eva Hesse: Sculpture

“I would like the work to be non-work….It is my main concern to go beyond what I know and what I can know.” – Eva Hesse The work of Eva Hesse (1936-1970), one of the greatest American artists of the 1960s, continues to inspire and to endure in large part

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Reality in 4-D

For most of us, life in three dimensions is difficult enough. But not for Tony Robbin. For Robbin, an acclaimed artist and geometry enthusiast, the real challenge comes in visualizing the fourth dimension. Ever since his debut at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1974, Robbin has been bent

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The End Justifies the Green

What do The Godfather, The Cat in the Hat, and Machiavelli’s The Prince have in common? According to Stanley Bing in this weekend’s Wall Street Journal, they are among the five books that offer the soundest advice for proper business etiquette. Before your eyes roll too far into the back

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Nearest Thing to Heaven

The foursquare view from the top of the Empire State, even more than the sweep of Manhattan that was available from the summit of the twin towers, is one of life’s great vistas. It may not quite be, as the building’s primary booster and moving force, Al Smith, argued, better

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We Wept Without Tears

Tomorrow, the 27th of Nisan on the Hebrew calendar, is Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day. This day is set aside each year to remember the approximately six million Jews who were killed in the Holocaust, since, as Elie Wiesel said, “For us, forgetting was never an option. Remembering is a

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The Princess Bride and Her Dress

Fifty years ago this week, in what was hailed as “the wedding of the century,” Hollywood icon Grace Kelly was married to Prince Rainier III of Monaco. In commemoration of the anniversary, the Philadelphia Museum of Art is now displaying, for the first time since 1997, the bride’s famous wedding

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Sketches from a Secret War

Aspiring artist turned intelligence operative, powerful statesman, and underground activist, Henryk Józewski was an instrumental figure in the battle for Polish independence during the tumultuous decades of the early and mid twentieth century. He put down his paintbrush long enough to direct Polish intelligence in Ukraine, govern the borderland region

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In Memoriam: William Sloane Coffin, Jr.

“The world is too dangerous for anything but truth and too small for anything but love.” – William Sloane Coffin, Jr. The Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr., a magnet for controversy, the media, and followers, and the premier voice of northern religious liberalism for more than a quarter-century, died yesterday

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Portraits of the Hazleton Public Schools

“A good story in a picture is much better than being alive. Being alive is complicated and hard, but a good picture — I can get lost in it.” – Judith Joy Ross For three years in the early 1990s, as a way of revisiting the experience of growing up,

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Green Squall

“April is the cruelest month,” T.S. Eliot once wrote, and for the last ten years, since its inception in 1996 by the Academy of American Poets, has also been National Poetry Month. As part of this month-long national celebration of poetry, and in order to mitigate April’s cruelty, Yale Press

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