Humanities

Karl Kraus: Apocalyptic Satirist

“The secret of the demagogue is to make himself as stupid as his audience so that they believe they are as clever as he.” – Karl Kraus If you’ve never heard of Karl Kraus, the Austrian satirist who inflicted withering and witty critiques on the mass media, the military-industrial complex,

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Proustmania

The Summer issue of BookForum features a number of new titles on Marcel Proust, including two by the acclaimed Proust biographer William C. Carter, whose Marcel Proust: A Life was named a New York Times Notable Book in 2000. Carter’s new Proust in Love portrays Proust’s amorous adventures and misadventures

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Société Anonyme

“Traditions are beautiful–but to create them–not to follow.” – Franz Marc, motto of the Société Anonyme Before there was MoMA, there was the Société Anonyme, an organization founded in 1920 by Katherine S. Dreier, Marcel Duchamp, and Man Ray as America’s first “experimental museum” for contemporary art. Aiming to provide

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In Memoriam: Jaroslav Pelikan

“What you have received as an inheritance from your fathers, you must possess again in order to make it your own.” – Jaroslav Pelikan’s motto, from Goethe’s Faust Jaroslav Jan Pelikan, Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University and one of the foremost scholars on the history of Christianity,

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Crush Wins Triangle Award

The 18th annual Publishing Triangle Awards, honoring the best lesbian and gay fiction, non-fiction, and poetry published in 2005, were presented last week in New York City. The Thomas Gunn Award for Gay Poetry went to Richard Siken’s Crush. This is only the latest in the string of accolades Richard

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Eva Hesse: Sculpture

“I would like the work to be non-work….It is my main concern to go beyond what I know and what I can know.” – Eva Hesse The work of Eva Hesse (1936-1970), one of the greatest American artists of the 1960s, continues to inspire and to endure in large part

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Reality in 4-D

For most of us, life in three dimensions is difficult enough. But not for Tony Robbin. For Robbin, an acclaimed artist and geometry enthusiast, the real challenge comes in visualizing the fourth dimension. Ever since his debut at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1974, Robbin has been bent

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The End Justifies the Green

What do The Godfather, The Cat in the Hat, and Machiavelli’s The Prince have in common? According to Stanley Bing in this weekend’s Wall Street Journal, they are among the five books that offer the soundest advice for proper business etiquette. Before your eyes roll too far into the back

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Nearest Thing to Heaven

The foursquare view from the top of the Empire State, even more than the sweep of Manhattan that was available from the summit of the twin towers, is one of life’s great vistas. It may not quite be, as the building’s primary booster and moving force, Al Smith, argued, better

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We Wept Without Tears

Tomorrow, the 27th of Nisan on the Hebrew calendar, is Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day. This day is set aside each year to remember the approximately six million Jews who were killed in the Holocaust, since, as Elie Wiesel said, “For us, forgetting was never an option. Remembering is a

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