Interviews

An interview with John Klein, author of the new book Matisse and Decoration

Yale UP: What did “decoration” mean to Matisse? John Klein: Many times Matisse said or wrote that his main goal in making art was expression. He didn’t mean expressing emotions – anger, joy, fear, etc. Instead he meant that an artwork should convey the inner life of its artist in

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Art on Its Own Terms: Author Amelia Peck on Gee’s Bend Quilts in My Soul Has Grown Deep

Rachel High– Recently published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and distributed by Yale University Press, My Soul Has Grown Deep: Black Art from the American South accompanies the exhibition History Refused to Die: Highlights from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation, on view at The Met Fifth Avenue through September

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In Your Digital Dreams: Art in the Age of the Internet

Interview with Jeffrey De Blois By David Ebony One of my first internet projects was to write a monthly column for a website called Art Icons, beginning in the early 1990s. An experimental site, short-lived, and now defunct, Art Icons was perhaps one of the first web venues devoted exclusively

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Grant Wood

We recently had the great pleasure of interviewing Barbara Haskell, American art historian and curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art.  She curated the current exhibition, Grant Wood: American Gothic and Other Fables, and edited the accompanying book. Yale University Press: Grant Wood hasn’t had a major exhibition in

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Illuminating the Void: Gordon Matta-Clark’s Urban Interventions

Interview with Bronx Museum curator Antonio Sergio Bessa By David Ebony In recent years, I have been periodically spending time away from the city, in a rural area in upstate New York. It’s a pleasure to be closer to nature after many years as a city dweller. Gardening is a

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Brazil’s First Art Cannibal: Tarsila do Amaral

Interview with curators Stephanie D’Alessandro and Luis Pérez-Oramas by David Ebony The paintings of Brazilian artist Tarsila do Amaral (1886-1973)—simply known as Tarsila—and the theory of Anthropophagy, or the philosophy of “cultural cannibalism,” introduced in 1928 by Tarsila’s first husband, Brazilian poet Oswald de Andrade (1890-1954), were for me a

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The World Is Never Sane: Delirious with Author Kelly Baum

From our colleagues at The Metropolitan Museum of Art comes an interview between Rachel High, Publishing and Marketing Assistant in the Met’s editorial department, and Kelly Baum, curator of an exhibition on the art and history of delirium from 1950 to 1980, which is on view at the Met Breuer

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A Conversation Between Patrick Modiano Translators Mark Polizzotti and Damion Searls

On the heels of our publication of Nobel Prize winner Patrick Modiano’s Such Fine Boys and Sundays in August in English, two of his esteemed translators sat down to discuss Modiano’s idiosyncratic and impressive body of work and the distinct nuances of translating it. It is with great pleasure that we present

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Immortal Oracle: the Berlin Painter Speaks: An Interview with J. Michael Padgett by David Ebony

David Ebony — In dark times of social turmoil, political upset, and the seemingly perpetual war and violence that define our present era, it helps to consider the art of the far distant past for some solace, and a bit of elucidation, perhaps. Today, democracy seems as fragile as it

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“Beauty and the Bologna: the 2017 Whitney Biennial” Interview with the curators Christopher Y. Lew and Mia Locks by David Ebony

David Ebony– This year’s Whitney Biennial, on view through June 11, is an extraordinary exhibition for a number of reasons. Widely regarded as the premier museum survey of contemporary art in the U.S., the Biennial, now in its 78th incarnation, is the first to take place in the Whitney’s new

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