Science

Ep. 31 – The Mystery of Gravity Waves and Black Holes

Scientists have finally measured gravitational waves from the collision of black holes. Marcia Bartusiak explains why this matters and talks about some of the universe’s most mysterious objects. http://traffic.libsyn.com/yaleuniversitypresspodcast/2017-6-22-Black-Holes.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS

The (False) Promise of Social Media Self-Enterprise

Brooke Erin Duffy— With the skyrocketing growth of the independent employment economy, entrepreneurialism has emerged as a profoundly romanticized ideal for workers and career aspirants alike. A survey published last year by the Economic Innovation Group reported that sixty-two percent of eighteen to thirty-four year olds have considered launching their

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What Gravitational-Wave Astronomy May Reveal

Marcia Bartusiak— Early last year, the field of astrophysics announced one of its biggest discoveries. A cosmic phenomenon that Albert Einstein had predicted a century earlier was at last detected directly. Two massive black holes collided, their spectacular merger generating huge ripples—gravitational waves—in the very fabric of space-time. After spreading

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Ep. 29 – Social Media and Protests

What role does social media play in networked protests? Zeynep Tufekci discusses this, online privacy, and how to combat fake news online. http://traffic.libsyn.com/yaleuniversitypresspodcast/2017-6-1-Social-Media-Protests.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS

Returning to the Final Frontier?

Valerie Neal— In the 1960s, Americans were clear about the reasons to embark on travel across the vast new ocean of space. More than once, President John F. Kennedy presented a clear and compelling rationale, best distilled in a speech delivered at Rice University on September 12, 1962. Near the

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Credit and Collaboration in Cutting-Edge Cosmology

Priyamvada Natarajan— Rather unusually, the team leaders who led the observational efforts that discovered dark energy were awarded the Nobel Prize in 2009 for a discovery from 1998, a rather swift reward by normal standards in physics. According to Alfred Nobel’s wishes, this annual physics prize can be awarded to

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The Enigma of Gravitational Energy

Marcia Bartusiak— To the practiced eye, Einstein’s equations stand as the quintessence of mathematical beauty. When it was introduced in 1915, general relativity was hailed as a momentous conceptual achievement. But for a long time the theory had little practical importance. Although the scientific community embraced general relativity—and recognized Einstein

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From FM to the Smartphone: The Evolution of Radio Media

Thomas Hazlett— The Age of Wireless has triggered excitement, disruption, and challenge. Debates rage on about the value of social media, how to deal with the threat of cyber hacking, and the regulation of emerging networks. But beneath it all lies a hardened policy structure that doles out radio spectrum

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Finding the Future of Environmentalism in its Past

Benjamin Heber Johnson— Most environmental protections are predicated on the use of state power. When Americans feared that a species would soon be pushed over the brink of extinction, they passed laws forbidding or limiting hunting it; when they valued an area for the serene majesty of its old-growth timber,

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The Rare Metals of the iPhone

David S. Abraham— Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer was incredulous. “There’s no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share. No chance,” Ballmer prophesied during a CEO Forum before Steve Jobs released the iPhone in June. But, by the end of the first week of sales, most

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