Tag alberto manguel

#BookLoversDay: Books about Books for Book Lovers

Feed your book cravings with a book about book, it’s International Book Lovers Day! This list features books about reading books, writing books, studying books, and the history of the book format itself. Book yourself some time to book up in a comfy chair and book out. (How many times

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Manguel, Dante, and the Origins of Curiosity

The following is an excerpt from Alberto Manguel’s latest book, Curiosity. The word itself has been seen through the ages as the impulse that drives our knowledge forward and the temptation that leads us toward dangerous and forbidden waters. Here, Manguel explains the origins of the word as he sets the scene

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For Your Armchair by the Fire

Alberto Manguel has a beautiful library. His life has been dedicated to the art and collection of books. The Argentine-born writer was once a reader to Jorge Luis Borges, who, blind by this point, nurtured Manguel’s interest in literature. In the time since, Manguel has become a world-renowned translator, editor,

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Alberto Manguel: “Borges and the Impossibility of Writing”

Alberto Manguel delivers the Finzi-Contini Lecture at Yale University, entitled “Borges and the Impossibility of Writing”. He is introduced by Maria Menocal, director of the Whitney Humanities Center. An acclaimed anthologist, translator, essayist, novelist, and editor, Manguel once served as a reader for Jorge Luis Borges and has been hailed

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Follow Friday Links: April 16, 2010

More great links this week: @jonathasmello clues us in on John Cage’s rather strange dietary habits through the video posted above. @drshow (The Diane Rehm Show) links to their interview with Taliban author Ahmed Rashid while @WashUnplugged prepares for their Monday airing. @Fictional 100 and @celticglambert both recommend Alberto Manguel’s

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Follow Friday Links: March 26, 2010

    This new regular blog feature presents a weekly roundup of interesting links related to Yale University Press, courtesy of the keen-eyed citizens of the Twitterverse: @cafsimard reflects on Alberto Manguel’s troublingly negative review of Roberto Bolaño’s latest work. @flloydpk quotes a particularly tongue-twisting passage from Edith Grossman’s Why

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