Tag American icons

The Gateway Arch : A National Icon with a Troubled Past

An abstract and mysterious structure, the Gateway Arch in St. Louis conveys wonder, but leaves many visitors questioning the “why” behind the monument. Its history is surprisingly sordid. In The Gateway Arch: A Biography, a new addition to the Icons of America series, author Tracy Campbell documents the series of

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How We Think about Wall Street

Read an excerpt from Wall Street Last month Strike Debt, an offshoot group of Occupy Wall Street, began buying strangers’ debt in order to make it disappear. Another manifestation called Occupy Sandy swooped in during the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy to assist gathering and delivering supplies, filming a documentary in the

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A Prolonged Silence: John Cage and Still After

Follow @yaleARTbooks September 5, 2012 marks the 100th birthday of American composer John Cage, most often known for the silently performed 4’33’’. Though Cage’s silence as a composition has been deeply considered on Yale University Press’s list with Kyle Gann’s Icons of America book, No Such Thing as Silence, the

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The Statue of Liberty: Changes of the Eternal Symbol

The Statue of Liberty may be the most recognized symbol in all of American culture. Its form dominates pop culture, portrayed in high profile advertising campaigns and highlighted on tourists’ kitschy tee shirts. But despite the universality of its image, what the icon actually represents remains open to interpretation, changing

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I Is Someone Else: The Ever-changing Persona of Bob Dylan

“Je est un autre,” “I is someone else,” is one of Bob Dylan’s maxims. With 34 studio albums, over 500 songs, and a career that spans fifty years Bob Dylan’s voice is one recognizable to generations. Generations that each have their own memories of a different Dylan, a Dylan that

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Notes from a Native New Yorker: Jackson Pollock, Naturally

Michelle Stein— As a New Yorker considering nature and the environment this month, I wanted to look beyond the enclaves of nature in New York City parks to the representations of nature—both realistic and abstract—found in the museums and galleries of New York.  For one perspective I turn to Evelyn

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Have You Seen “The Joy of Books?”

Here’s a fun new video: “The Joy of Books” by crazedadman on YouTube, animating the shelving of books at Type Bookstore in Toronto.  In just a day’s time, the video has already racked up over 27,000 views. We found it through GalleyCat, but the attentive YUP-lover will note two of

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For the Dangerous Artist, and His Admirers

When it comes to the artistic Icons of America, Jackson Pollock might not always first come to mind, though asking who else might be is an equally difficult question.  Norman Rockwell’s art offers the quintessential vision of ideal families, and those of the Hudson River School paint the American landscape.

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For the Once and Future Hollywood Star

Even if you’ve never set foot in the state of California, there is no doubt that you are familiar with a certain collection of nine letters that sits atop a hilltop towards the state’s southern reaches. According to Leo Braudy, the Hollywood sign is far more than “240 tons of

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For (In)Decency’s Sake

Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer has long been famous for its sexual content and explosive style. First printed in 1934 by a Parisian publisher known for soft-core pornography, Tropic of Cancer was banned in the United States, with the only available copies making their way across the Atlantic under the

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