Tag American Modernism

Christopher Long on Kem Weber, Modern American Designer and Architect

Among our exciting fall books is one about German-born American designer Kem Weber, whose fascinating life story rivals his outstanding design work in interest.  The book’s author, Christopher Long, will be delighting California audiences next week with talks about Kem Weber – he has an event at the AD&A Museum

Continue reading…

Ellen Landau on Mexico and American Modernism

Follow @yaleARTbooks Follow @Caroline_Hayes_ Art historians are just beginning to uncover the influence of Mexico on American modernism. In looking beyond Europe’s effect on American modernism in the 20th century, Ellen G. Landau’s important new book, Mexico and American Modernism brings forth a piece of history long in shadow. She

Continue reading…

Classic Modern: The Art Worlds of Joseph Pulitzer Jr.

For the May 13 centennial of Joseph Pulitzer Jr.’s birth, Marjorie B. Cohn, author of Classic Modern, the first biography of Joseph Pulitzer, Jr. to focus on his art collecting—arguably his greatest passion—and his role in bringing modernism to the American Midwest, writes here about one of the pleasures of writing the biography of a

Continue reading…

Curator Jennifer Gross on the Société Anonyme

Follow @yaleARTbooks Following the post on the exhibition catalog, a Q&A with Jennifer Gross, Seymour H. Knox, Jr., Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Yale University Art Gallery and editor of The Société Anonyme: Modernism for America. What specifically prompted Dreier and Duchamp to found the Société Anonyme?  What

Continue reading…

Société Anonyme

Follow @yaleARTbooks In 1920, three luminaries of the American art world—Katherine Dreier, Marcel Duchamp, and Man Ray, founded Société Anonyme. Frustrated by America’s indifference and frequent hostility to its artists, Dreier and Duchamp sought to cultivate a community of American modern artists that would inspire, through exhibitions, lectures, and eventually

Continue reading…

For the Harlem Renaissance Man

Emily Bernard starts her biography, “This book is a portrait of a once controversial figure, Carl Van Vechten, a white man with a passion for blackness.” And while today more people can recognize Carl Van Vechten as a patron and leader of the black arts and Harlem Renaissance movement, in

Continue reading…

Carl Van Vechten in Correspondence

Read an excerpt from Carl Van Vechten and the Harlem Renaissance Carl Van Vechten, the controversial patron of the Harlem Renaissance, was indeed a Renaissance man: art critic, novelist, adviser, social host and man-about-town. Yet in his role as a letter writer we see him as a passionate epistolary friend.

Continue reading…

Ida is Ida is Ida is Ida: Watching Gertrude Stein Write a Novel

In response to a question about her most famous line, “A rose is a rose is a rose is a rose” Gertrude Stein once replied “Now listen! I’m no fool. I know that in daily life we don’t say ‘is a…is a…is a…’” Like many modernists, Stein was looking to

Continue reading…

Happy Father’s Day Birthday, Carl Van Vechten

A sensitive discussion will ensue for anyone who names Carl Van Vechten a “father” of the Harlem Renaissance. Although married to Russian actress Fania Marinoff, Van Vechten never had children. Nevertheless, he was a patron and active supporter of many young artists and writers, including Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston,

Continue reading…

Eminent Biography: Emily Bernard on Carl Van Vechten’s Women

In her second piece for “Eminent Biography” Emily Bernard, author of Carl Van Vechten and the Harlem Renaissance: A Portrait in Black and White, explores the relationships of Carl Van Vechten and the many women who circled through his interracial and inter-artistic world of the Harlem Renaissance. After all, it is

Continue reading…