Tag american revolution

Did Taxes Cause the American Revolution?

Justin du Rivage— Alexander Hamilton was barely out of his teens when he mounted his swashbuckling defense of the Continental Congress in 1774. If colonists failed to stand up to Parliament, he told his fellow New Yorkers, before long their “tables, and chairs, and planters, and dishes, and knives and

Continue reading…

A Fight Over Fundamentals: Progressivism in the Current Contest

Stephen Skowronek— The rap on Hillary Clinton’s leadership is that she fails to convey any high purpose. When she tries to rally the nation to her cause, she falls back on what has long been the common sense of American government: pragmatic problem solving, social and economic amelioration, nimble adaptations

Continue reading…

Beginning the World Anew: An Interview with Janet Polasky

Today we’re talking revolutions. We recently spoke with historian Janet Polasky, whose latest book Revolutions without Borders: The Call to Liberty in the Atlantic World discusses the eighteenth‑century travelers who spread new notions of liberty and equality during the time of the American Revolution. What emerges is that the dream of liberty among America’s

Continue reading…

Civil Disobedience: An American Tradition

In the newly published Civil Disobedience: An American Tradition, Lewis Perry traces the history of civil disobedience in the United States from its pre-revolutionary backgrounds to the present. Amidst the controversy that ebbs and flows over civil disobedience, and the studies of individuals and events, there seems to be one

Continue reading…

The Men Who Lost America: “The Tyrant”

As we transition from American History November to Holiday Gift-giving December, we are sharing a series of previews of Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy’s profiles of the British leaders during the American Revolution from The Men Who Lost America, beginning with King George III. Each profile looks carefully at the myths that have develop around each

Continue reading…

The British Government Responds to News of the Battle of Yorktown

Now available in North America, Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy‘s unique account of the American Revolution in The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire, told from the perspectives of King George III, Lord North, General Burgoyne, and other British leaders, brings to light the

Continue reading…

A New Tour of Georgian London’s Fleet Street Shows Its Mixed Race American Side

Julie Flavell, author of When London Was Capital of America and Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, takes you on a unique walk of Georgian London in the days when southern American visitors were bringing a mixed race look to the neighborhood. “What Dr Johnson Knew” Julie Flavell— “How is

Continue reading…

The Spy Who Loved U.S.

If the perfect crime is one that never gets discovered, then the perfect spy is one whose identity is never revealed. Edward Bancroft came close to becoming the latter: a century passed before the public realized that he had engaged in espionage. Many Americans do not even recognize Bancroft’s name,

Continue reading…

To London, with Love: For the Returns Shopper

Ivan Lett Admittedly, it’s a bit early in the season to think about gift returns, but today is the anniversary of the Boston Tea Party. The 1773 Tea Act was hardly a gift, but unless you’ve been hiding under the harbor all year, you know all about the current political

Continue reading…

Notes from a Native New Yorker: Trading Ideas with the Past

Michelle Stein Yale Press’s books manage to take the reader all across the world, and look in depth at a great many topics.  They also have a great many books that delve into the city of New York, where I was born and have thoroughly explored.  I hope to also

Continue reading…

  • 1 2