Tag art

Art in Nazi Germany

Michael Kater— Much has been made in recent weeks in the international press of German chancellor Angela Merkel ordering pictures by Modernist painter Emil Nolde to be removed from her offices. There was also mention of an exhibition in Berlin featuring Nolde’s works, which, according to the New York Times

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The What and the Where of Color

David Scott Kastan & Stephen Farthing— Our lives are saturated by color. The sky above us is blue (or gray or pink or purple or nearly black). The grass we walk on is green, though sometimes it is brown. Our skin has color, though not exactly the color we normally

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The Origin of Empathy

Susan Lanzoni— Is it possible to empathize with lines in an abstract design, with the expansive reach of a tree, the sweep of a bird’s flight, or the imposing rise of a range of mountains? Can we “feel into” forms and shapes? If today we know empathy as a way

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Art + Science: The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot

This piece at the intersection of Art + Science is a post written by a former Yale University Press intern after she visited the 2012 exhibition at the Bard Graduate Center, The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot: Fractals, Chaos, and the Materiality of Thinking.  The book that accompanied the exhibition shares its title,

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For the Contemplative Artist

In Interviews with Artists, Michael Peppiatt writes about his meetings with a variety of artists, architects, and photographers, such as R.B. Kitaj, Frank Auerbach, Francis Bacon, Claes Oldenburg, Norman Foster and Henry Moore. He begins his introduction by saying, “I have always thought that if you can get the artist to

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Books et Veritas: Art, Photography, and Dressing Up

Olivier van Donselaar— As an international transfer student coming from London, a city famous for its vibrant and diverse cultural scene, I experienced culture shock and serious disorientation during my first couple of weeks in New Haven. There was, however, one place I could go to that felt at least

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What is 4’33”?

Today is the birthday of the composer John Cage, who is best known for 4’33”, a piece of music in which no intentional sounds are made by the artist or performer. Many, if not most, have encountered references to the piece, at least in comics and cartoons. Yet it may not be immediately

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Negative Rhythm: Intersections Between Arp, Kandinsky, Münter, and Taeuber

Bibiana K. Obler— Here’s an assignment. Read my book. Then read the following excerpt from a letter from Wassily Kandinsky to Hans Arp, dated November 1912: The disharmoniousness (one might say, the negative rhythm) of the individual forms was that which primarily drew me, attracted me, during the period to

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Bernard Berenson: Living a Life Devoted to Great Art

Bernard Berenson’s life is an inspiring story of a poor immigrant to America achieving great fame and fortune. A sensitive and articulate consumer of art, his incredible eye and his talent for engaging listeners in interpretations of artworks took him from his humble beginnings to a lavish lifestyle assisting Gilded

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Albers App Colors Interaction on Facebook and Pinterest

“The gateway to an entire way of thinking. . . .It will blow your mind.”—Liz Stinson, Wired The Interaction of Color App for iPad has captured the attention of artists, designers, and color geeks of all sorts in the two shorts weeks since its launch. Twitter has gotten much more colorful

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