Tag biography

Streisand – Redefining Beauty, Femininity, and Power

Neal Gabler— She always seemed to be an example. She was an example of chutzpah. As one fan would say of Streisand’s legacy, “For me, it began with her first revelation: by shoving a Jewish girl’s face in front of the cameras she was announcing, beneath all the self-deprecation, I’m

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The Legacy of Jane Austen and the Industry of “Jane Austen”

Fiona Stafford– When Jane Austen spoke of being “in love with” Clarkson, in a private letter of 1813, she was referring to the indefatigable antislavery campaigner Thomas Clarkson and his splendid History, which charted the progress of the abolitionist movement. Two hundred years later, the name of Clarkson would be

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Why do readers clamor for books about people they’ve already heard of?

Today we’re sharing a blog post from one of our authors, Ann Little, on her new book The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright. Her blog, Historiann, will feature a post about the book every Tuesday, and we will feature them here on our blog. “Hey, kids:  It’s publication day. Huzzah! The

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David and Moses: The Men, the Myths, the Legends

David Wolpe— David represents one strand of the Jewish tradition, one that these days causes so much pride and angst and generates so much news. Jewish religious history is divided, in some senses, between Moses and David: Moses is the desert, wandering, and Mt Sinai. David is the land, government,

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Eugene O’Neill: A Life in Four Acts

Four seems to be Eugene O’Neill’s lucky number. He was the recipient of four Pulitzer Prizes for Drama, the most won by any single playwright. His most famous play, Long Day’s Journey Into Night, was written in four acts. Robert Dowling’s new biography Eugene O’Neill: A Life in Four Acts, forthcoming this October continues

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Analyzing Freud, the Master of Psychoanalysis

“Biographers, Freud knew even as a young man, spoke on other people’s behalf—like parents, doctors, rabbis, and politicians. Psychoanalysis was to be a medical treatment which enabled people to speak on their own behalf.”—Adam Phillips, Becoming Freud In his biography of Sigmund Freud’s early life, Becoming Freud: The Making of

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May Goodreads Giveaways

This month, we’re giving away three books on Goodreads – Michael S. Roth‘s Beyond The University, Linda R. Wires‘ The Double-Crested Cormorant and Becoming Freud, by Adam Phillips. Whether you’re hoping to read about American intellectual history, conservation biology, the art of biography and psychoanalysis, or just something fascinating and altogether different, we’ve got plenty of books

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The Most Famous Roman Ever to Have Lived

See all 20% off titles in our YUP Backlist History promotion! In a key moment of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, the titular character famously declares: I could be well moved, if I were as you; If I could pray to move, prayers would move me; But I am constant as the

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For the Introspective Writer

No one sings as purely as those who inhabit the deepest hell—what we take to be the song of angels is their song. —Franz Kafka in a letter to Milena Jesenska, August 26, 1920 The anguished metaphor that Kafka describes to Jesenska is perhaps characteristic of his life and work.

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Sneak Peek of Whistler: A Life for Art’s Sake

In March of 2014, we will publish the first biography of James McNeill Whistler in 20 years.  Whistler: A Life for Art’s Sake by Daniel E. Sutherland offers a more human portrait of the artist than ever before published, balancing the popular image of Whistler as a boastful and confrontational

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