Tag civil rights

Struggling and Failing to Break White Supremacy and Injustice

Gary Dorrien— Martin Luther King Jr., at the end of his life, fixed on three reform objectives, a movement ambition, and something bigger. The policy objectives were to terminate racial discrimination in housing, establish a minimum guaranteed income, and end America’s global militarism. Sometimes he put it in ethical terms,

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King’s Dream: Civil Rights and the History of Nonviolent Protest

On this day in 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. gave what is widely hailed as the best political speech of the twentieth century. King famously departed from his prepared text to expound upon his dream, a vision of a nation living in racial harmony. Folk history has it that Mahalia

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Photographing the Civil Rights Movement in Unfamiliar Streets: a Guest Post by Katherine Bussard

Katherine A. Bussard’s superb new book Unfamiliar Streets: The Photographs of Richard Avedon, Charles Moore, Martha Rosler, and Philip-Lorca diCorcia was recently featured at one of the New York Public Library’s “An Art Book” evenings. If you weren’t able to be there, you can listen to the proceedings: Today, we’re

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Civil Disobedience: An American Tradition

In the newly published Civil Disobedience: An American Tradition, Lewis Perry traces the history of civil disobedience in the United States from its pre-revolutionary backgrounds to the present. Amidst the controversy that ebbs and flows over civil disobedience, and the studies of individuals and events, there seems to be one

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For All the World to See

In September 1955, shortly after Emmett Till was murdered by white supremacists in Money, Mississippi, his grieving mother, Mamie Till Bradley, distributed to newspapers and magazines a gruesome black-and-white photograph of his mutilated corpse. Asked why she would do this, Mrs. Bradley explained that by witnessing, with their own eyes,

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The Brown Bomber

Boxing is arguably the most intense of individual sports—high stakes, blood, sweat, and (involuntary) tears, all eyes on you in the ring. It’s no mean feat to hold the title of world heavyweight boxing champion for nearly twelve years. In fact, it’s a record still held today, over sixty years

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The Hanging of Thomas Jeremiah

Not all slave owners were white. On the eve of the American Revolutionary War, South Carolina’s slave population was nearly double that of white Europeans, and while there were a still a handful of free blacks, “free” took a marginalized status in the face of color discrimination. Perhaps the richest

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Molly Rogers’ DELIA’S TEARS and More on Black Family History

This afternoon at 4:30pm, Molly Rogers, author of Delia’s Tears: Race, Science, and Photography in 19th-Century America, will be interviewed by eminent historian David Blight about her book here on Yale’s campus. The book retells the story of seven South Carolina slaves who were photographed at the request of Swiss

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Notes from a Native New Yorker: Gershwin’s “Porgy and Bess”

Michelle Stein George Gershwin’s music is a near inimitable part of American culture.  Though he lived a short life, dying at the age of thirty-eight, the work he composed during his life offered a long-lasting heritage and contribution to American musicals and concert pieces. In 1935, Gershwin’s American folk opera

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More on the Marriage and Discrimination Debate

In November 2008, California voters approved Proposition 8, a decision that had a considerable impact on the same-sex marriage debate. Though the proposition had passed with 52% of the vote, its constitutionality was challenged in a 2009 case brought by two gay couples.The case, Perry v. Schwarzenegger, argued that Proposition

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