Tag color

Color Codes

David Scott Kastan— Up until the eighteenth century, Asian people appeared white to European eyes. Sometime early in 1515, a Portuguese merchant named Tomé Pires sent a detailed account of his three years of Asian travel to King Manuel I and described the people he met there as “white, just

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Ep. 61 – On Color

We’re talking about color this week—where it comes from, how we see it, and its role in our lives.   Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify

Interaction of Color app in the classroom

As Albers weeks draws to a close, and we reflect on the legacy of this great educator (Josef Albers died 38 years ago today, on March 25th, 1976), we realized it was an opportune moment to consider the lasting effects of Albers’s teaching methodologies on the way color theory is

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Albers on the Walls: A Virtual Tour

Our focus this week on all things Albers has allowed us to notice anew the numerous instances of Albers imagery right here in our offices in New Haven.  The following slideshow takes you on a virtual tour of our Yale University Press offices through the Albersiana we have on our

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Josef Albers Contest: Fill in the blanks

It’s Albers week here at Yale University Press and today we have a contest for you. There exists amazing archival footage of Josef Albers in the classroom, and Albers describing his teaching methodologies; some of this is included among the video content in the Interaction of Color app.  The following

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A Color a Day, a Celebration for a Week, the Interactions of a Lifetime, Happy Birthday, Josef Albers!

Get the app for $7.99 this week! To celebrate Albers’s birthday, we are pleased to offer a temporary discounted price on the app – for the next week, the app will be downloadable from iTunes for a mere $7.99. Happy birthday to Josef Albers, who was born on March 19th,

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Tuesday Studio: Kurt Schwitters

Even for those who speak German, the word Merz may be difficult to translate. Coined in 1919 by the avant-garde artist Kurt Schwitters (1887-1948), Merz is more of an idea than an object; more of an approach to art than art itself. A truncated version of the German word for

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