Tag democracy

Can Human Beings Understand the Economy?

Pascal Boyer— It is in the nature of human beings that they create societies. Philosophers have known and said that much for millennia. These days, scientists can paint a detailed picture of how evolution by natural selection made us social animals, providing us with those capacities and preferences that makes

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The Rural Race to Arms

Loka Ashwood— Rural Americans do, indeed, have more guns than their urban counterparts. According to the General Social Survey, the highest rates of gun ownership can be found in the most rural areas of the southeast United States. In those wide-open fields and forests, rural residents—black and white—are more likely to

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The Social Media Myth

Philip N. Howard— Since the great tragedy of Charlie Hebdo, politicians and pundits around the world have succumbed to the notion that social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, are to blame for violent online extremism. They argue that social media is not only a conduit for terrorists it is

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Remembering Robert Dahl

Robert A. Dahl (1915 – 2014), eminent political scientist and champion of democracy, passed away on February 5, 2014 in Hamden, Connecticut, at age 98. Named by Foreign Affairs magazine the “dean of American political scientists,” Dahl was instrumental in building one of the first modern political science departments. Dahl authored hundreds of articles and dozens

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Is America Still a Democracy?

Stein Ringen, author of the recently published Nation of Devils: Democratic Leadership and the Problem of Obedience, writes here on the current state of American democracy in light of the recent shutdown, financial concerns driving policy, and the possible erosion of the government into “soft despotism.” His book addresses one of the primary

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Democracy in Retreat: A Divided Egypt

Democracy has long been upheld as the ideal way to run a country. America, “land of the free” is revered for its representative government elected by the people for the people, and the US has committed to a mission of spreading and supporting democracy worldwide. In Joshua Kurlantzick’s newest book

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London Olympics 2012: Whose Games Are They Anyway?

Neil Faulkner is the author of A Visitor’s Guide to the Ancient Olympics, now available from Yale University Press. With only 30 days left before the Opening Ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Games,  we thought to share some insight into the side of the Games you won’t see, even those as

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The Late Republic?

In today’s Wall Street Journal, Mark Miller writes, “There are points of similarity between the political culture of late republican Rome and our own, but the differences reveal how far we have to go before we hit bottom — contrary to the dire warnings emanating from certain political quarters today.”

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Does American Democracy Still Work?

With the midterm congressional races heating up and November 7 right around the corner, we are once again privileged witnesses of American democracy in action…or, as Alan Wolfe sees it, American democracy inaction. In his new book, Does American Democracy Still Work?, Wolfe identifies the current political conditions that have

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“America at the Crossroads” in the Limelight

Francis Fukuyama’s new book, America at the Crossroads: Democracy, Power, and the Neoconservative Legacy, was featured on the cover of this past weekend’s edition of the New York Times Book Review. “Fukuyama is always worth reading,” the reviewer concludes, “and his new book contains ideas that I hope the non-neoconservatives

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