Tag environmental studies

Memories of the 1938 Hurricane

Stephen Long— Memory is a capacity both individual and cultural. Think back to when the recent economic downturn began in 2007 and how frequently it was compared to the Great Depression. Some called it the “great recession” to reinforce the comparison. Because so many individuals could tell firsthand tales about

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Overfishing – the silent crisis beneath the ocean’s surface

Brian Fagan— Sustainable catches. These magic words now appear on many higher-end restaurant menus. Many top chefs and organic markets are working with fisherfolk to handle only catches from maintainable fisheries. This is wonderful and socially responsible, but how does this move stack up against the bigger picture of severely

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“It’s the Climate, Stupid.”

Geoffrey Parker— Once upon a time, climate change was a hot topic. In 1979 the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the United Nations Environment Programme, the National Science Foundation, the Ford Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation paid for 250 historians, geographers, archaeologists and climatologists from thirty countries to share their expertise

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The Discovery of Acid Rain

Gene E. Likens and Richard T. Holmes— Acid rain or acid precipitation or acid deposition as it is variably called, was first identified in North America more than five decades ago at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.  Scientists who were initiating the Hubbard

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January Theme: Nature & Environment

Follow @yaleSCIbooks A new year and new beginnings: the world around us changes; so do we change alongside it, often because of it. For the second year in a row, we are taking the month of January to discuss books on nature and environment. Both presently and historically, climatic, biological,

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January Theme: Nature & Environment

Follow @yaleSCIbooks We’re starting off the New Year by taking a close look at where we are, how we got there, and what we can do to change. This month we’ll be covering new books like Austin Troy’s The Very Hungry City, examining energy and economic sensibilities for cities and

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