Tag history

The Center of the Universe

Marcia Bartusiak- Walk into an open field on a clear, moonless night. Overhead, sparkling stars are sprinkled across the sky. All of them seem equidistant from you—and no one else—and you are lulled into imagining yourself at the center of the universe. For nearly five hundred years, astronomers have struggled to

Continue reading…

A History of Servers: From Lazy Suzan to Alexa

Markus Krajewski— When Amazon introduced the world to a black, cylindrical cartouche with built-in ears and a female voice that answers to the name of Alexa in 2015, more than a few people have been looking forward to its promising and, more importantly, affordable services as a so called virtual

Continue reading…

Zionism and Human Rights: A Conversation with Historian James Loeffler

Human rights are universal. They belong to everyone, as the term implies. But the movement for human rights is a story grounded in particulars: a time, a place, a group of people. That story is told, brilliantly and for the first time, in Rooted Cosmopolitans: Jews and Human Rights in

Continue reading…

Diamonds, love and history

Jack Ogden— Mention of diamonds stirs up a variety of emotions and images, from Marilyn Monroe singing “Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend” to conflict stones, and, of course, the perennial questions as to how big and how much. Approaching diamonds through the eyes of a historian, and traveling back

Continue reading…

Strangers of Familiar Soil

Edward Dallam Melillo— On October 31, 1967, California governor Ronald Reagan addressed seventy-three diplomats, businesspeople, and academics who had assembled in Sacramento for the fourth annual Chile-California Conference. As the former Hollywood actor and future US president told his audience, “Well, Chile is something special to California, and to Californians

Continue reading…

The Pros and Cons of Globalization

Peter Singer— Consider two aspects of globalization: first, the ability of people living in Afghanistan, Iraq, or Yemen to bring sudden death and terror to New York, London, Madrid, Paris, and Sydney; and second, the emission of greenhouse gases from power stations, vehicles, and even cattle. The former leaves unforgettable

Continue reading…

Duwamish Federal Recognition: Making Family Reunions Sovereign as Well as Sweet

Katrina Jagodinsky— For many Americans, summer is a season marked by patriotic holidays and family gatherings. Memorial Day kicks off our appreciation for military service and three-day weekends, Fourth of July announces independence through pyrotechnics, and Labor Day offers the last, official, summer day of rest whether we choose to

Continue reading…

How the Bible Became Holy: An Interactive Timeline

Follow @mlsatlow Follow @yaleRELIbooks Though it is easy to see the Bible today as a singular work – one text held as holy by many religious believers – it has a less straightforward history. The Bible was compiled over time from the writings of religious figures whose influence depended on

Continue reading…

Veterans Day Photography

Follow @yaleARTbooks Today is Veteran’s Day in the United States, on which day we honor all of those who have served our nation in armed service.   It is also Armistice Day and Remembrance Day, which recognize the end of World War I.  A visually and emotionally powerful monument to war

Continue reading…

A New Theory on a Past Catastrophe

Geoffrey Parker prefaces his new book with a collection of quotes, including: “The times here are so miserable that never in the memory of man has the like famine and mortality happened.” –East India Company officials, letter, Surat, India, 1631 ”Among all the strange occurrences of disaster and rebellion, there had

Continue reading…

  • 1 2