Tag history of science

Out of the Shadows / Robert Hooke

John Gribbin— Who was the first person to realise that gravity is a universal force possessed by every object in the Universe, which attracts every other object? Isaac Newton, right? Wrong! Newton got the idea, and other insights which fed into his theory of gravity, from Robert Hooke, a seventeenth-century polymath

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The Nine Lives of Bayes’ Rule

While a staple in modern-day statistics classes, Bayes’ rule, as  immortalized in our statistics textbooks, has been killed and revived several times. Although public opinion on this theory has waxed and waned dramatically, was Bayes’ rule ever fully dismissed? Sharon Bertsch McGrayne in her book, The Theory That Would Not Die:

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Goodreads Giveaway: A Little History of Science

Follow @yaleSCIbooks Following our recent interview with author William Bynum, we’re excited to sponsor a Goodreads Book Giveaway of his latest book A Little History of Science. This small volume packs a punch by relating the historical achievements and discoveries in physics, biology, chemistry and astronomy, in 40 small chapters

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January Theme: Nature & Environment

Follow @yaleSCIbooks A new year and new beginnings: the world around us changes; so do we change alongside it, often because of it. For the second year in a row, we are taking the month of January to discuss books on nature and environment. Both presently and historically, climatic, biological,

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For the Busy Lover of Science

It’s no easy feat to provide an account of the entire history of science in a single book, much less make that history a “little” one: nevertheless, an undaunted William Bynum sets out to fulfill this very task in his latest project. A Little History of Science traces the march

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A Conversation with William Bynum on A Little History of Science

As ambitious as the project of charting the history of science over the past few centuries sounds, William Bynum takes on the task readily in his latest book, A Little History of Science, fashioned after E.H. Gombrich‘s bestselling A Little History of the World.  He brings readers, both young and old, on a

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Thomas Jefferson’s Scientific Love Affair

Follow @yaleSCIbooks The name Thomas Jefferson brings to mind some of his greatest achievements: Author of the Declaration of Independence, third President of the United States, and Founder of the University of Virginia. But there’s another side to America’s Renaissance man that, though less well known, is just as praiseworthy.

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Edward J. Larson on the Explorers of the South Pole

Follow @yaleSCIbooks Published to coincide with the centenary of the first expeditions to reach the South Pole, An Empire of Ice: Scott, Shackleton, and the Heroic Age of Antarctic Science, by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Edward J. Larson, is a riveting biographical and scientific account of Antarctic exploration, restoring these expeditions’

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Left Brain? Right Brain?

Follow @yaleSCIbooks Growing up, many of us were taught that our left brain was the source of reason and logic, while our right brain ruled over imagination and creativity. However, according to prominent psychiatrist Iain McGilchrist, this is not the whole truth. In a video recently posted on the website

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The Bayesian Making of America

Follow @yaleSCIbooks Sharon McGrayne’s The Theory That Would Not Die is the story about a statistical method of analysis that almost wasn’t.  Created by the Reverend Thomas Bayes and further molded by scientist Pierre-Simon Laplace, Bayes’ theorem is a statistical analysis method for probability that takes an initial guess or

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