Tag Holocaust

American and Israeli Jews Tell Different Truths About the Holocaust

Hannah Pollin-Galay— “The End of the Jewish People is Here.” This is not a headline from the 1940’s but from June 2018. It appeared as one of many articles reporting on a survey conducted by the American Jewish Committee, which polled American and Israeli Jews on a range of contemporary

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A World Without Jews: The Nazi Imagination from Persecution to Genocide (Author Interview Video)

Follow @yaleRELIbooks On the night of November 9, 1938, now known as Kristallnacht, the Nazis burned the Hebrew Bible everywhere in Germany. In the video below, Alon Confino explains why this act, among the other horrors committed that night, was particularly unusual. There is not a direct connection between the Nazi’s racist ideology

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Book Excerpt: A World Without Jews: The Nazi Imagination from Persecution to Genocide

Follow @yaleRELIbooks Alon Confino‘s A World Without Jews: The Nazi Imagination from Persecution to Genocide centers itself around an important question: Why exactly did the Nazis burn the Hebrew Bible everywhere in Germany on November 9, 1938? The events of Kristallnacht have not been adequately accounted for by historians in their large-scale assessments

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For the Introspective Writer

No one sings as purely as those who inhabit the deepest hell—what we take to be the song of angels is their song. —Franz Kafka in a letter to Milena Jesenska, August 26, 1920 The anguished metaphor that Kafka describes to Jesenska is perhaps characteristic of his life and work.

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Raphael Lemkin: The Unsung Hero Who Gave Genocide Its Name

Guilt without guilt is more destructive to us than justified guilt, because in the first case catharsis is impossible. He was the man who coined the term “genocide” and dedicated his entire life to making it illegal — but most people still don’t know his name. Raphael Lemkin, a Holocaust

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Morris’s 1948 is a critics’ favorite

Under the spotlight of the 60th anniversary of Israeli independence, Benny Morris’s recent book, 1948, is a praised as a shining example. Last Sunday’s New York Times Book Review features David Margolick’s review, saying: “Morris relates the story of his new book soberly and somberly, evenhandedly and exhaustively.” The May

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Yale Press wraps up Nat’l Poetry Month with awards and readings

At their annual awards ceremony last night, The Publishing Triangle announced Janet Malcolm, author of the critically acclaimed Two Lives: Gertrude and Alice, as winner of the Judy Grahn Award for Lesbian Nonfiction. View the complete list of award winners here. This remarkable work of literary biography and investigative journalism,

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Malcolm’s Two Lives makes NBCC’s Good Reads List

Two Lives by Janet Malcolm made the National Book Critics Circle’s Good Reads Long List for Nonfiction. The list is comprised of “the nonfiction titles which received multiple votes” from the NBCC. It was announced this morning on the NBCC blog here, where you can find the entire list, along

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And the Emmy goes to…

The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences announced on July 18 that I’m Still Here, a documentary based on the diaries of young Holocaust victims, has been nominated for two Emmy Awards. The first category is Outstanding Historical Programming (Long Form), and the second is Outstanding Individual Achievement in

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We Wept Without Tears

Tomorrow, the 27th of Nisan on the Hebrew calendar, is Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day. This day is set aside each year to remember the approximately six million Jews who were killed in the Holocaust, since, as Elie Wiesel said, “For us, forgetting was never an option. Remembering is a

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