Tag India

Of Holy Rivers and Human Rights: Protecting the Ganges by Law

Sudipta Sen— On March 20, 2017, the highest court in the state of Uttarakhanda, India declared the river Ganges (known as the Ganga in India) and its main tributary Yamuna as rights-bearing “living entities,” effectively granting them the legal status of personhood. Uttarakhanda is a northern Indian state that borders

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Ep. 73 – Mughal Architecture Including—and Beyond—the Taj Mahal

The Taj Mahal is deserving of its role as one of the most famous and recognizable buildings in the world; Professor Chanchal Dadlani explains why subsequent architecture, from the later years of the Mughal Empire, deserve our attention, as well. Subscribe:Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | Soundcloud

An Ending: India’s Railway Children

Jonah Steinberg— Nobody was tending to the body, which was arrayed on the tracks in at least three recently-separated pieces, its vessels, sinews, and bones protruding, trailing everywhere. The legs were torn off—the severed femurs sticking jaggedly out—and with them, the garments, so that the victim lay naked and exposed.

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Before and After Apollo

Bernd Brunner— History often rewards great breakthroughs but ignores the preparatory steps that made those achievements possible. The Apollo program, for instance, has been documented in great detail and still receives ample attention, but what of the extraordinary labors that led to that summit? How was flight to the moon

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Criminal Politicians on the World Stage

Milan Vaishnav— On February 11, voters in the north Indian state of Uttar Pradesh (UP) began the process of selecting the 403 men and women who will represent them in their state legislature. In India, where elections are about as frequent as a new Bollywood blockbuster, the news of yet another

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Books et Veritas: India and the Caste System — a Literary Conceptualization

Simran Chahal— After the recent and controversial release of India’s Daughter, a documentary regarding the brutal gang rape of 23 year-old physiotherapy student Jyoti Singh in 2012, many questions are being raised about the status of women in Indian society. However, though I support the unearthing of such stark realities

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Gandhi’s Non-Violent “Raid” During the Salt March

Arvind Sharma— The Salt March, which Mahatma Gandhi launched in March of 1930 constitutes a watershed in India’s independence struggle and as such, we might be tempted to view it as a single decisive event which brought the struggle to a boil. It was, however, more like a series of

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The Monastery at Ranod: Exploring The Remains of Medieval India

Today, we are very proud to publish an important new book – Tamara Sears’s Worldly Gurus and Spiritual Kings: Architecture and Asceticism in Medieval India, the first full-length study of the matha, or Hindu monastery, which developed in India at the turn of the first millennium.  In the course of

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