Tag literature

The Idea of Yugoslavia: Translating Miljenko Jergović’s “The Walnut Mansion”

The Walnut Mansion by Miljenko Jergović—translated by Stephen M. Dickey with Janja Pavetic-Dickey—is a grand novel that encompasses nearly all of Yugoslavia’s tumultuous twentieth century, from the decline of the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires through two world wars, the rise and fall of communism, the breakup of the nation, and

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How Did We Read in the Past?

Abigail Williams— On April 15th, 1802, Dorothy and William Wordsworth took one of the most significant walks in literary history. They set out in blustery weather, across the fells near Ullswater in the Lake District. It was misty and mild, with a strong wind, and the first signs of spring were

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A Conversation with Leo Braudy: Embodiments of Fear in Books, Films, Religion, and More

Yale University Press had the pleasure of interviewing Leo Braudy, author of the forthcoming Haunted: On Ghosts, Witches, Vampires, Zombies, and Other Monsters of the Natural and Supernatural Worlds. Braudy, a finalist for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award, is also the author of The Frenzy

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Proust’s Lasting Appeal

William C. Carter— A question I am often asked is why do I never tire of reading Proust’s In Search of Lost Time? How does this novel continue to speak to generation after generation in a voice that seems fresh and vigorous? How does Proust manage to breathe so much

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Dangerous Books in America, Britain, and France

Books have always had the power to make authorities rather uncomfortable. Sometimes it’s because the novel makes the government look bad, goes against the teachings of a particular religion, or says things that are simply too salacious. In A Little History of Literature, John Sutherland takes a look at how

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A Conversation with Clive James

In August 2015 Yale published Latest Readings, by the celebrated memoirist, poet, translator, critic and broadcaster Clive James. As he contemplates life and mortality, James muses that “if you don’t know the exact moment when the lights will go out, you might as well read until they do.” We spoke to Clive James

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What SUP From Your Favorite University Presses, October 10, 2014

Welcome to our weekly roundup of news from university presses! Once again, there is a lot to share this week from our fellow academic publishing houses and much to learn on What SUP at the social university presses. This week was a flurry of excitement over the announcement of the

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Win a Gift from Yale University Press in our Holiday Goodreads Giveaways!

This December we are joining in the holiday spirit by giving away some our favorite books from the year. The holidays are a time for reflection, and each of these books looks back at the history of our world, from the evolution of man, to the great literary artists of

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Staff Holiday Picks: From the Director

John Donatich— This year I loved reading books that couldn’t help but get tangled in the web of presidential politics.  Mickey Edwards was both prophetic and prescriptive in The Parties Versus the People: How to Turn Republicans and Democrats into Americans, carefully reviewing the symptoms of a political system effectively

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Yale Press Podcast Episode 29: Amos Oz & Fania Oz-Salzberger

Listen to the podcast interview for Jews and Words on iTunes! Somewhere between the What is Jewish Culture? event at the 92Y launching the Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization and the NPR Weekend Edition interview with Scott Simon, we managed to catch Amos Oz and Fania Oz-Salzberger to

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