Tag memoir

Patrick Modiano on Childhood

In the past year, Patrick Modiano has been hailed by American book critics for his Nobel Prize-winning literary art, rightly described as “elegant,” “haunting,” and “urbane.” In books such as Suspended Sentences, Paris Nocturne, and After the Circus, his immense gifts as a novelist—one who melds ambiguous autobiographical and impressionistic details into narratives

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Translating Trans-Atlantyk: Behind the Scenes with Danuta Borchardt

Many consider Polish novelist Witold Gombrowicz one of the greatest writers of the past hundred years and Danuta Borchardt is undoubtedly one of his finest translators. Her rendering of Ferdydurke won the 2001 National Translation Award given by the American Literary Translators Association, and her recent edition of Trans-Atlantyk has garnered praise as

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Peter Mansoor on the Iraqi Surge

“The subsequent failures in Iraq shouldn’t take away from what American troops accomplished during what may well be the biggest comeback ever in a guerrilla war….Mansoor provides the definitive account of how it was accomplished…Mansoor is superbly positioned to tell the story, not only because of his academic training but

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September Theme Sign-up for Books: Memoir & Memory

In choosing Memoir & Memory as our monthly theme for September, a reflection of our year in publishing the genre was telling: A particularly monumental year for Yale University Press in its release of personal letters and correspondence, we published The Richard Burton Diaries (Oct. 2012, pbk July 2013), edited by

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Svetlana Alpers: A Life Spent Looking

“This is not art history, and it is not criticism, nor is it some mixture of the two. It is not, in other words, what people expect me to be doing.”—Svetlana Alpers, Roof Life, “1 Beginning” Svetlana Alpers is one of the most influential art historians of her generation. She

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A Conversation with Rachel Adams on Raising Henry and a Book Giveaway

Publishing this month, Rachel Adams‘s Raising Henry: A Memoir of Motherhood, Disability, and Discovery gives a deeply moving and honest account of welcoming a baby born with Down syndrome. Adams, a professor of English and American studies, is also director of the Future of Disability Studies Project at Columbia University. In the interview below,

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Lest We Forget: What It’s Like to Lose It

Sarah Underwood— Quite a few people, places, and things “lost it” in 2011. Ireland, Spain, Portugal, and Greecelost it early on this year. Osama bin Laden lost it. Multiple Arab dictators lost it. The economy never had it, but Greecemanaged to lose it again. The media keeps suggesting that even

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Colinvaux’s Amazon Expeditions is a “scientific detective story”

Amazon Expeditions: My Quest for the Ice-Age Equator by Paul Colinvaux was recently reviewed in the Publishers Weekly Review Annex. They found the book to be “an exciting account of field work under challenging and sometimes dangerous circumstances. They went on to say that Amazon Expeditions is “a rewarding read

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Cook’s Alfred Kazin a complex, fascinating subject

Richard M. Cook’s Alfred Kazin: A Biography, about one of the most important literary critics of the 20th century, has in turn become the subject of articles by literary critics from The New York Sun, The Los Angeles Times Book Review, and The New York Times Book Review. In his

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The Unknown Battle of Midway

“The Unknown Battle of Midway is a memoir and more,” writes Robert Messenger in the Wall Street Journal. “Mr. Kernan brings this maritime battle superbly to life. He explains the whole history of the U.S. carriers and their arsenal and the commanders and pilots who were trying to learn on

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