Tag modern art

Brazil’s First Art Cannibal: Tarsila do Amaral

Interview with curators Stephanie D’Alessandro and Luis Pérez-Oramas by David Ebony The paintings of Brazilian artist Tarsila do Amaral (1886-1973)—simply known as Tarsila—and the theory of Anthropophagy, or the philosophy of “cultural cannibalism,” introduced in 1928 by Tarsila’s first husband, Brazilian poet Oswald de Andrade (1890-1954), were for me a

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The Ceramic Presence in Modern Art

Sequoia Miller– Long on the fringes of mainstream narratives of modern art, ceramics are typically considered a field of practice entirely distinct from painting, works on paper, and more conventional forms of sculpture. The Yale University Art Gallery’s recent publication The Ceramic Presence in Modern Art: Selections from the Linda

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Available Now: Albers Interaction of Color App for iPad

The wait for the Interaction of Color app for iPad is finally over. The full app, available now in the app store, is free to download, and allows you to sample Chapter 10, including accompanying text, video commentary, two interactive plates, and the palette tool. The complete app–featuring the full text, 125 plates,

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Classic Modern: The Art Worlds of Joseph Pulitzer Jr.

For the May 13 centennial of Joseph Pulitzer Jr.’s birth, Marjorie B. Cohn, author of Classic Modern, the first biography of Joseph Pulitzer, Jr. to focus on his art collecting—arguably his greatest passion—and his role in bringing modernism to the American Midwest, writes here about one of the pleasures of writing the biography of a

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The Arts, Occupied: France’s Shameful Peace with the Nazis

Read an excerpt from The Shameful Peace “Long live the shameful peace,” said writer and artist Jean Cocteau. It was World War II; France was now occupied by German forces, and the cultural elite were faced with how to survive. Frederic Spotts takes Cocteau’s offhand remark as his title in The

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Curator Jennifer Gross on the Société Anonyme

Follow @yaleARTbooks Following the post on the exhibition catalog, a Q&A with Jennifer Gross, Seymour H. Knox, Jr., Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Yale University Art Gallery and editor of The Société Anonyme: Modernism for America. What specifically prompted Dreier and Duchamp to found the Société Anonyme?  What

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Société Anonyme

Follow @yaleARTbooks In 1920, three luminaries of the American art world—Katherine Dreier, Marcel Duchamp, and Man Ray, founded Société Anonyme. Frustrated by America’s indifference and frequent hostility to its artists, Dreier and Duchamp sought to cultivate a community of American modern artists that would inspire, through exhibitions, lectures, and eventually

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In Commemoration of Lucian Freud

Follow @yaleARTbooks Painter Lucian Freud, grandson of Sigmund Freud, died on this day one year ago, and it is on this anniversary that we reflect on the English artist’s extraordinary legacy.  Perhaps best-known for his nude portraits, Freud perfected his style of portraiture during a period in the history of

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Center of Influence: Alfred Stieglitz

It’s hard to imagine what American art today would look like without Alfred Steiglitz. A photographer in his own right, Steiglitz was also the gallery owner who first exhibited Rodin and Picasso in the United States, the husband who championed Georgia O’Keeffe as the first truly American modernist, and the

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Happy Birthday, Georgia O’Keeffe: Free Excerpt of Letters to Stieglitz

Born November 15, 1887, Georgia O’Keeffe lived 98 years to become one of the most well known and celebrated American artists of the twentieth century. But to her husband Alfred Stieglitz, the man who had first brought her work to New York, she was “Sweetestheart”, and he was “Dearest Duck.”

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