Tag modern art

The Intimate Art of Sol LeWitt

David S. Areford— Sol LeWitt. For the dedicated or even occasional museum visitor, the artist’s name conjures up expansive and colorful murals (his “wall drawings”) and equally commanding, large-scale cubic sculptures (his “structures”). Often installed in grand public interior or exterior settings, these artworks collaborate with the architectural and spatial

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Klee and Kandinsky Side by Side

Michael Peppiatt— Even if Paris lost its prominence as the art centre of the world around the mid-twentieth century (with existentialism waning and Abstract Expressionism on the rise), everything in the French capital operated as if nothing had changed a decade later when I began writing gallery ‘round-ups’ for various

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A Personal Canon: Elise Archias on Five Influential Texts

The art history I write and teach is stuck in the mid-century modern period across much of the globe–roughly 1945-1970–because those years saw the end of a “modern” way of thinking and the start of a contemporary, or some would still say “postmodern,” outlook. I want to go back and

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Marcel Duchamp and the Museum    

Matthew Affron–                       Marcel Duchamp had a large role in his own enshrinement at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. He helped the Los Angeles collectors Walter and Louise Arensberg to form their outstanding holdings of modern art, including the largest, most

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Illuminating the Void: Gordon Matta-Clark’s Urban Interventions

Interview with Bronx Museum curator Antonio Sergio Bessa By David Ebony In recent years, I have been periodically spending time away from the city, in a rural area in upstate New York. It’s a pleasure to be closer to nature after many years as a city dweller. Gardening is a

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Brazil’s First Art Cannibal: Tarsila do Amaral

Interview with curators Stephanie D’Alessandro and Luis Pérez-Oramas by David Ebony The paintings of Brazilian artist Tarsila do Amaral (1886-1973)—simply known as Tarsila—and the theory of Anthropophagy, or the philosophy of “cultural cannibalism,” introduced in 1928 by Tarsila’s first husband, Brazilian poet Oswald de Andrade (1890-1954), were for me a

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The Ceramic Presence in Modern Art

Sequoia Miller– Long on the fringes of mainstream narratives of modern art, ceramics are typically considered a field of practice entirely distinct from painting, works on paper, and more conventional forms of sculpture. The Yale University Art Gallery’s recent publication The Ceramic Presence in Modern Art: Selections from the Linda

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Available Now: Albers Interaction of Color App for iPad

The wait for the Interaction of Color app for iPad is finally over. The full app, available now in the app store, is free to download, and allows you to sample Chapter 10, including accompanying text, video commentary, two interactive plates, and the palette tool. The complete app–featuring the full text, 125 plates,

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Classic Modern: The Art Worlds of Joseph Pulitzer Jr.

For the May 13 centennial of Joseph Pulitzer Jr.’s birth, Marjorie B. Cohn, author of Classic Modern, the first biography of Joseph Pulitzer, Jr. to focus on his art collecting—arguably his greatest passion—and his role in bringing modernism to the American Midwest, writes here about one of the pleasures of writing the biography of a

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The Arts, Occupied: France’s Shameful Peace with the Nazis

Read an excerpt from The Shameful Peace “Long live the shameful peace,” said writer and artist Jean Cocteau. It was World War II; France was now occupied by German forces, and the cultural elite were faced with how to survive. Frederic Spotts takes Cocteau’s offhand remark as his title in The

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