Tag nature

Thoreau: Fully Annotated

In a month, it will have been ten years since Jeffrey S. Cramer published Walden: A Fully Annotated Edition. Cramer has had a prolific and successful decade, editing numerous volumes on Henry David Thoreau and racking up awards and praise. In 2012, radio host Jim Fleming said that Cramer “may know

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Nature As Public Art

This month’s theme focuses on public art, touching on fashion, street art, fine art, and, what may tend to get overlooked, the art found in nature. Nature is around all of us whether it be a tree lining a city street or sprawling mountain ranges covered in thick forests. Nature itself could

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Arcadian America: A New Direction in Narrative History

Arcadian America, written by Aaron Sachs, takes a look back at nineteenth-century garden cemeteries and relates them to our current moment of environmental crisis. Throughout, Arcadian America presents the reader with a great deal of historical facts and context, which Sachs effortlessly blends with cultural criticism and personal memoir to

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Rabbits, Rhubarb, Raccoons, Oh My! My Very Own Backyard Jungle

Thanks to the insight of James Barilla’s new book, My Backyard Jungle: The Adventures of an Urban Wildlife Lover Who Turned His Yard into Habitat and Learned with It, we at Yale University Press are sharing stories of our own backyards and the specially hidden, and often overlooked, secrets contained

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Edward McCord on The Value of Species

Follow @yaleSCIbooks In The Value of Species, Edward L. McCord both celebrates the immense breadth of life forms found on earth—from the rainforests and oceans to the prairies and deserts—and defends its value in the face of ever-more-urgent environment threats to biodiversity. Drawing on concepts from philosophy, law, and ethics

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Who Runs the World? Ants!

Follow @yaleSCIbooks It is to be expected that ants with eventually begin crawling on your picnic blanket as you try to enjoy an outdoor lunch on a sunny afternoon in a New England park. Though they seem to exist solely to be nuisances, ants play a fundamental part of our

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Lest We Forget: Poems, Nature, Food, and Keeping Your Day Job

Sarah Underwood— Reading poetry normally does not make me hungry, but after “Lake of Little Birds,” poet Katherine Larson had me ready for “[s]wordish/ drizzled with virgin oil, rubbed with/ mint and saffron”…and several other dishes. The 2010 winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets prize uses her experience

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January Theme: Nature & Environment

Follow @yaleSCIbooks We’re starting off the New Year by taking a close look at where we are, how we got there, and what we can do to change. This month we’ll be covering new books like Austin Troy’s The Very Hungry City, examining energy and economic sensibilities for cities and

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IPPY Awards

Y-IPPY!  YUP and our museum distribution partners won ten awards at the 2010 Independent Publisher Book Awards! Fine Art Cézanne and Beyond, by Joseph J. Rishel and Katherine Sachs (Philadelphia Museum of Art) The Drawings of Bronzino, by Carmen C. Bambach, Janet Cox-Rearick and George R. Goldner (The Metropolitan Museum of

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