Tag New York

“Undoing a building” with Gordon Matta-Clark

Antonio Sergio Bessa– In his foreword to the 2007 Whitney catalogue, museum director Adam Weinberg wrote with great insight that Gordon Matta-Clark’s work “resisted commodification and the museum context.” I would add that to counter the tendency to commodify, the experiential element in presenting his work is of utmost importance. 

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What SUP From Your Favorite University Presses, July 25, 2014

Welcome to our weekly roundup of news from university presses! Once again, there is a lot to share this week from our fellow academic publishing houses and much to learn on What SUP at the social university presses. This week, we visit Machu Picchu, address New York City’s inequality, and

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“Banksy’s Better Out Than In” by World Atlas of Street Art and Graffiti Author Rafael Schacter

Follow @yaleARTbooks Follow @RafaelSchacter Rafael Schacter— He’s not the most visually arresting of the so-called “street-artists”.[1] He’s definitely not the most conceptually astute.[2] He’s not the most innovative[3] or emotive,[4] nor the most site-specific[5] or materially prolific.[6] In truth, he’s not even the sharpest political commentator within the movement,[7] nor

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Penone Momentousness

Follow @yaleARTbooks A colleague of ours had the opportunity last week to attend the opening events for Italian artist Giuseppe Penone’s outdoor exhibition in New York’s Madison Square Garden, and offered the following observation. Giuseppe Penone joins the ranks of prominent sculptors (Sol Le Witt, Jessica Stockholder, Mark di Suvero, and Leo Villareal,

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Staff Holiday Picks: For the Radical Photographer

Follow @yaleARTbooks Yale University Press Executive Editor, William Frucht, weighs in on the history of photography and its intersection with art and politics from the pages of The Radical Camera: New York’s Photo League, 1936-1951, by curators Mason Klein and Catherine Evans; the catalogue accompanies an exhibition currently on view at the Contemporary

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Building the Cloisters

Follow @yaleARTbooks At first glance The Cloisters might be seen as an anachronism to its northern Manhattan neighborhood. Nestled within Fort Tryon Park (opened 1935), sitting above a grid of 1920s low-rise apartments, 1950s high-rise housing projects and the requisite array of fast food franchises, parking garages, and bodegas that

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How We Think about Wall Street

Read an excerpt from Wall Street Last month Strike Debt, an offshoot group of Occupy Wall Street, began buying strangers’ debt in order to make it disappear. Another manifestation called Occupy Sandy swooped in during the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy to assist gathering and delivering supplies, filming a documentary in the

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The Circus in America

Follow @yaleARTbooks In the introduction to Circus and the City: New York, 1793-2010, the catalogue accompanying a fabulous exhibition of the same name currently on view at the Bard Graduate Center in Manhattan, curator Matthew Wittmann recalls his own experience watching the hulking elephants of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum and

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Happy Birthday, Berenice Abbott!

After exploring her creative urges through journalism, sculpture, poetry, and theater, Berenice Abbott (1898–1991) found a home for her artistic talents in photography while working in Paris as a darkroom assistant to Man Ray. Abbott knew Ray from an earlier encounter in New York, and though at the beginning of

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Black Gotham 2.0: Carla L. Peterson’s History Making for the Digital Age

Where do we draw the line between our own personal history – history with a small “h” – and the History we consider public knowledge – history with a big “H”? This is an important question for historical researchers of any caliber. It shapes the way we value (and the

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