Tag Painting

Art + Science: Jennifer Raab on Frederic Church

Jennifer Raab — Years ago, standing in front of Frederic Edwin Church’s The Heart of the Andes (1859) at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, I wondered, why is this painting so detailed? This was the first word that came to mind when looking at the picture. It was also the

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On Corita Kent and the Language of Pop

Corita Kent and the Language of Pop is an exhibition opening this Thursday, September 3rd, at the Harvard Art Museums.  The Boston Globe recently published a piece in which Cate McQuaid whimsically proposes that if Don Draper and Mother Teresa had a love child, it would be Corita Kent.  The

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Art + Science: Michelle Foa on Georges Seurat

Today we are excited to introduce you to a new series on our our Yale University Press Art & Architecture blog: Art + Science.  Posts featured here will occupy that fascinating space where the visual arts overlap with scientific pursuits and discoveries.  Today, we are sharing a guest post by Michelle

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Negative Rhythm: Intersections Between Arp, Kandinsky, Münter, and Taeuber

Bibiana K. Obler— Here’s an assignment. Read my book. Then read the following excerpt from a letter from Wassily Kandinsky to Hans Arp, dated November 1912: The disharmoniousness (one might say, the negative rhythm) of the individual forms was that which primarily drew me, attracted me, during the period to

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The Eye Man: An Interview with Richard Estes by David Ebony

David Ebony— Richard Estes is one of a very few painters from the original Photorealist movement of the 1960s and early ’70s who remains true to the precepts of the genre and has continued to thrive. Unlike those of many other practitioners of Photorealism, Hyperrealism or Super-realism, as the movement

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One Year Later: Clare Elliott reflects on Forrest Bess and Seeing Things Invisible

Clare Elliott – One year after its opening at the Menil Collection, Houston, Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible has made its third appearance, at the Neuberger Art Museum at SUNY, Purchase. In between Houston and New York the exhibition was on view at the Hammer Museum at UCLA, and following its

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Van Gogh at Work

Follow @yaleARTbooks Van Gogh struggled with volume. When at the age of 28 he decided to become an artist, he took to copying contours of nude models from a drawing guide called Exercises au fusain (exercises in charcoal). The figures were, sadly, flat and stiffly composed. Later in his career,

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A Peek Inside German Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1350–1600

Passing through the art section of a bookstore, you might find yourself arrested by the haughty gaze of Hermann von Wedigh III.  The young merchant sits confidently at a table against a brilliant blue background, with a small book resting by his right elbow. “Herman von Wedigh III,” a painting

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The First Modern Woman Artist: Paula Modersohn-Becker

Caroline Hayes— Paula Modersohn-Becker (1876-1907) was a groundbreaking painter whose often-overlooked place in modernism forces us to reconsider our understanding of art in the early twentieth century. Modersohn-Becker was the first artist to paint herself nude, as well as mothers and children nude, and in doing so, challenged traditional representations

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Matisse: In Search of True Painting

Follow @yaleARTbooks The exhibition Matisse: In Search of True Painting explores Matisse’s practice of producing pairs of paintings, and the ways in which this practice influenced his development as artist.  Academically trained, Matisse learned composition and technique by copying older master paintings. This practice was not considered an empty, rote

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