Tag sculpture

Reflections on Africans in Gothic Sculpture, part 1

Saint Maurice in Magdeburg  Jacqueline E. Jung — The stunning sandstone sculpture of Saint Maurice made for Magdeburg Cathedral around 1250 – representing the fabled fourth-century leader of the Roman army’s Theban Legion, who allowed himself and his men to be killed for their embrace of the new Christian faith

Continue reading…

The Artist at Home with Her Art: Ruth Asawa

Interview with Tamara H. Schenkenberg by David Ebony   Japanese-American artist Ruth Asawa (1926-2013) is a unique figure in contemporary art. Her abstract sculptures, created with a novel, looped wire technique that resembles basket-weaving, are often misunderstood. For some, they embody the clash between craft and “fine art,” remaining uncertain as

Continue reading…

What SUP From Your Favorite University Presses, June 27, 2014

Welcome to our weekly roundup of news from university presses! Once again, there is a lot to share this week from our fellow academic publishing houses and much to learn on What SUP at the social university presses. This week, we remember the Freedom Summer, protect linguistic heritage, and use

Continue reading…

Shaping Humanity through Art and Science

Follow @yaleSCIbooks Imagine working at an excavation site on a mission to unearth pieces of our prehistoric past. And suddenly you discover a skull underneath mounds of dirt, the remains of a distant ancestor who has remained hidden for millennia. Such a discovery was celebrated in Georgia earlier this month

Continue reading…

Penone Momentousness

Follow @yaleARTbooks A colleague of ours had the opportunity last week to attend the opening events for Italian artist Giuseppe Penone’s outdoor exhibition in New York’s Madison Square Garden, and offered the following observation. Giuseppe Penone joins the ranks of prominent sculptors (Sol Le Witt, Jessica Stockholder, Mark di Suvero, and Leo Villareal,

Continue reading…

Caro: Close Up

Follow @yaleARTbooks Julius Bryant, Keeper of Word and Image at the Victoria and Albert Museum, curated the exhibition Caro: Close Up, and opened the show on October 17th with an illuminating lecture.  The exhibition features Sir Anthony Caro’s early paintings and smaller sculpture at the Yale Center for British Art,

Continue reading…

Happy 111th to Alexander Calder

On this day in 1898, artist Alexander Calder was born in Lawnton, Pennsylvania. Though the Press has no mobiles to erect in his honor (the University already took care of that for us), we do have a fine selection of books for fans of his work. The Surreal Calder focuses

Continue reading…

Remembering Robert Rauschenberg

Invention and bold experimentation are the legacy of Robert Rauschenberg’s legendary art career. On May 12, 2008, he died of heart failure in his Florida home and studio. Considered a man of many talents, he had his hand in every thinkable artistic medium, and his notoriety stems from his ability

Continue reading…

National Jewish Book Award names Eva Hesse finalist

Congratulations to Elisabeth Sussman and Fred Wasserman, authors of Eva Hesse: Sculpture, which is a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award in the Visual Arts category. Each year, the National Jewish Book Awards honor some of the best and most exciting authors in the field of Jewish literature. After

Continue reading…

Art and architecture books featured in NYT

In an article on “their favorite books of 2007,” New York Times art and architecture critics write “there is more to art books than gorgeous illustrations.” As an example of a book that is more than just “gorgeous illustrations, they name Yale’s The Gates of Paradise: Lorenzo Ghiberti’s Renaissance Masterpiece,

Continue reading…

  • 1 2