Tag Shakespeare

William Shakespeare: Political Commentator

Peter Lake— It is, of course, notoriously difficult to say anything novel, or even arrestingly interesting, about Shakespeare. In fact, I never intended to write a book about Shakespeare at all. But I fell into a set of questions and interests that resulted in a book, if not simply by accident, then at

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Shakespeare 400: Why Hamlet?

Gabriel Josipovici— Hamlet is the best-known work of literature in the English (and perhaps any) language, but it is also one of the most puzzling. We all feel we know it intimately, yet when we try to put that knowledge into words we find we hardly know it at all.

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#Shakespeare400 writ small… exquisitely small!

The Yale Center for British Art celebrates its grand reopening on May 11th, and this summer it will offer a marvelous exhibition: “The Poet of Them All”: William Shakespeare and Miniature Designer Binding from the Collection of Neale and Margaret Albert. Nearly one hundred exquisitely bound miniature editions of plays, sonnets, and

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Why Acting Matters

In Why Acting Matters, respected and insightful writers on movies and theater David Thomson examines the allure of the performing arts for both the artist and the audience member while addressing the paradoxes inherent in acting itself.  Thomson reflects on on-stage versus film acting, and on the cult of celebrity. He scrupulously

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Translating Trans-Atlantyk: Behind the Scenes with Danuta Borchardt (Part 2)

In last week’s post, available here, Danuta Borchardt explained some of the immediate challenges she faced in translating Trans-Atlantyk, a novel by the celebrated Polish writer Witold Gombrowicz. The farcical adventures of a penniless young writer stranded in Argentina are narrated in the style of the gawęda, a tale told by the fireside. The

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The Most Famous Roman Ever to Have Lived

See all 20% off titles in our YUP Backlist History promotion! In a key moment of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, the titular character famously declares: I could be well moved, if I were as you; If I could pray to move, prayers would move me; But I am constant as the

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Yves Bonnefoy’s New Writing on Shakespeare, Part II

Earlier this year, the publication of Yves Bonnefoy‘s Second Simplicity: New Poetry and Prose, 1991-2011, translated from the French by Hoyt Rogers, brought the French poet’s latest writings to an audience of English readers. Included in this translation were two unpublished fantasias on Hamlet— each a succinct tour de force that vividly

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Happy Birthday, Yves Bonnefoy: New Writing on Shakespeare

Yves Bonnefoy, often acknowledged as France’s greatest contemporary poet, turns 89 today. Earlier this year, the publication of Second Simplicity: New Poetry and Prose, 1991-2011, translated from the French by Hoyt Rogers, exposed Bonnefoy‘s latest writings to an audience of English readers. Included in the volume are two unpublished fantasias

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It’s Here: The Ides of March

CAESAR Who is it in the press that calls on me? I hear a tongue, shriller than all the music, Cry ‘Caesar!’ Speak; Caesar is turn’d to hear. SOOTHSAYER Beware the ides of March. Some might say that the death of Caesar on this day in 44 BCE was the

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Shakespearean Summer

For many, Shakespeare is synonymous with summer (or vice versa), with performances nationwide filling outdoor stages and parks for productions of his most popular plays. The Shakespeare Center in Los Angeles may have cancelled their summer show this year, but in New York, Central Park is the location of choice

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