Tag yale university art gallery

Spotlight on Josef and Anni Albers

Ivy Sanders Schneider– Josef Albers was a hugely influential German-born American artist and educator. This week — between March 19th, the day he was born in 1888, and March 25, the day he died eighty-eight years later — we highlight aspects of his life to commemorate his work and enduring legacy. Josef

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A Multimedia Exploration of Thomas Wilfred’s Art of Light

“[G]limmers of unfathomable light” … a “yolk-colored blob” … “a sensuous array of abstract composition moving in suspended and unknowable sequence” … “vivid tendrils and clouds, soaring and seeping like magma” … “bruises seen in time-lapse”. All of these descriptions represent attempts to capture in words the strange beauty of

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Podcast: Anni and Josef Albers and the art they collected

Anni and Josef Albers were two of the most influential figures of 20th-century modernism. Anni was a textile artist, and Josef was a professor and artist in glass, metal, wood, and photography, in addition to being the creator of one of the most important explanations of color theory principles, The

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The Ceramic Presence in Modern Art

Sequoia Miller– Long on the fringes of mainstream narratives of modern art, ceramics are typically considered a field of practice entirely distinct from painting, works on paper, and more conventional forms of sculpture. The Yale University Art Gallery’s recent publication The Ceramic Presence in Modern Art: Selections from the Linda

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Notes from the Field – Donald Blumberg Photographs: The Master Sets

Ivy Sanders Schneider– The American photographer Donald Blumberg has the eye of a scientist. Like slides enlarged and displayed, his photographs are data points: watch the news coverage of the Newtown Massacre shift over the course of the day; watch a couple exit Patrick’s Cathedral over the course of a

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Art + Science: Ian McClure on Diego Velázquez’s “Education of the Virgin”

Art conservation offers a fascinating overlap between the worlds of art and science; conservators examine works of art using tools and methods such as microscopy, X-radiography, X-ray fluorescence, and infrared reflectography, and their insight informs decisions about how to preserve, clean, store, transport, and display the works.  Here, Ian McClure,

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Books et Veritas: Art, Photography, and Dressing Up

Olivier van Donselaar— As an international transfer student coming from London, a city famous for its vibrant and diverse cultural scene, I experienced culture shock and serious disorientation during my first couple of weeks in New Haven. There was, however, one place I could go to that felt at least

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Museum Quality Books: Welcome, Fall and the Rapturous Attributes of Books

Welcome to the second edition of our new series, Museum Quality Books.  We last heard from Diane Lovejoy at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; today, Tiffany Sprague, Director of Publications and Editorial Services at the Yale University Art Gallery, explains how books have provided transportation for her above and beyond

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Happy Birthday, Lee Friedlander!

We celebrate American photographer Lee Friedlander today with a meditation on two of his recent publications. Elizabeth Malchione — As we celebrate Lee Friedlander’s 80th birthday today, I wanted to take a moment to reflect on his beginnings. His first major exhibition was “New Documents” at the Museum of Modern

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Countering the Reformation in Color

Francesco Vanni: Art in Late Renaissance Siena is now on view at the Yale University Art Gallery and will run through January 5, 2014. The accompanying catalog was written by John Marciari and Suzanne Boorsch and copublished by the Yale University Art Gallery and Yale University Press. Q & A with John Marciari

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